BushcraftOz | The Australian Bushcraft Forum

This is a sample guest message. Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Archaeology news.

Chigger

Mors Kochanski
Joined
Apr 4, 2018
Messages
376
Reaction score
221
Saw that in the news, a totally amazing find of early mankind art.
 

Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
Joined
Apr 29, 2011
Messages
871
Reaction score
425
Location
New England NSW

Very interesting biggles, thank you for sharing. I can't help wondering what it would be like if these animals were still alive! Such a shame they died out. Still it seems we won't be here ourselves in the next 100 years if the Climate Change charts are correct!!! And the majority will just go about their daily business & let it happen!!!
Keith.
 

Thrud

Richard Proenneke
Joined
Mar 9, 2013
Messages
2,425
Reaction score
704
Location
Perth, WA
Thanks HM.

There has been a lot of interesting archaeology from the underground tunnelling in London over the last few years.
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
Archivist
Joined
Sep 13, 2011
Messages
4,082
Reaction score
359
Location
Ironbark, SEQ
A taste for fat ...
""The meat of wild animals is lean,” Thompson says. “It actually takes more work to metabolize lean protein than you get back.”
In fact, eating lean meat without a good source of fat can lead to protein poisoning and acute malnutrition.
Early Arctic explorers, who attempted to survive on rabbit meat exclusively, described the condition as “rabbit starvation.”"

https://popular-archaeology.com/article/a-taste-for-fat-may-have-made-us-human-says-study/
 

Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
Joined
Apr 29, 2011
Messages
871
Reaction score
425
Location
New England NSW
A taste for fat ...
""The meat of wild animals is lean,” Thompson says. “It actually takes more work to metabolize lean protein than you get back.”
In fact, eating lean meat without a good source of fat can lead to protein poisoning and acute malnutrition.
Early Arctic explorers, who attempted to survive on rabbit meat exclusively, described the condition as “rabbit starvation.”"

https://popular-archaeology.com/article/a-taste-for-fat-may-have-made-us-human-says-study/

I did know about rabbit, but I did not know that it also referred to other wild meat. Interesting.
Thank you for sharing.
Keith.
 

Bloffy13

Jon Muir
Joined
Apr 11, 2012
Messages
2,833
Reaction score
163
Location
Albany, Western Australia
https://thewest.com.au/news/albany-...d-rewrite-wa-history-books-ng-b881125696z.amp

I like to read this post and have occasionally commented but this is about my home town, so worthy of a mention. For those not in the know, Albany is the first town in Western Australia, about three years older than Perth. Mt Barker is the next town north and now I know where it got its name. Also Mokare was a well known and respected person in Albany. Unfortunately, I think he fell victim to drink in his latter years. There's a prominent statue of him in the centre of town, depicted as a brave warrior, and at least two streets named after him around town.
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
Archivist
Joined
Sep 13, 2011
Messages
4,082
Reaction score
359
Location
Ironbark, SEQ

Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
Joined
Apr 29, 2011
Messages
871
Reaction score
425
Location
New England NSW

Edward

Ray Mears
Joined
May 22, 2018
Messages
407
Reaction score
290
Location
Outback, South Australia
First they found the Hobbits and now have they found the Elves? They were tool makers.
"Researchers digging in the Philippines's Callao Cave found teeth and bones that they say belong to a distinct species of ancient human, which they have named Homo luzonensis. "
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/...discovered-luzon-philippines-homo-luzonensis/
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/10/science/homo-luzonensis-philippines-evolution.html


Interesting. I know next to nothing about this stuff, but I wonder if it 'could' just be a deformity or a midget, a one off & not conclusive proof of a miniature species? Not to sound cynical or anything, but I'm just wondering if they would need more samples to be 100% sure of a new miniature species?
 
Last edited:
Top