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Bedrolls And Swags

MongooseDownUnder

Richard Proenneke
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The oilskin is usually lighter canvas though. I will work out the measurements etc and post it up. Yeah I use mine with a satchel bag or 2 and carries everything I need when bushcrafting.

Cheers
Adrian
 

Jason (banjo)

Malcolm Douglas
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Ok so i have found some oilskin on ebay for an ok price.But one is oilskin the other is DRY oilskin can someone tell me the differance in those , Cause i am going to buy some to make this bed roll..Just not sure which one to buy.??
 

ninefivefox

Mors Kochanski
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See if you can ask the seller, most of them are pretty good with answering questions because they don't want a disgruntled costumer.

Also did you see Auscraft's post in the swedish smock thread (I'm going from memory), there are different weights of oilskin I think 6 is for clothing and some one fond a seller on eBay which when they checked the weight it was 14. Something like that, it was a thread started by Howlingdingo, you should be able to find it if you search oilskin.
 

oldigger

Les Stroud
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A mohair rug inside a good woolen blanket (like a genuine Italian surplus one) will enhance the blanket's warmth without adding much to the overall weight. The Mohair traps a lot of air inside the blanket. A GI type poncho liner isn't a bad addition either.
 

oldigger

Les Stroud
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Traditional Swags

Instructions for how to make a more traditional type of swag/bedroll/groundmat can be found on YouTube in its “Longhunter” series of posts. The way they do it is with a canvas painters drop cloth (12' X 9'). You start by cutting off a 4' length so that you have a length 12' X 4'. You then double this so that you have a double piece 6' X 4'. You sew any raw edges and then sew one side.
I've taken several pictures of my work (in progress – it isn't proofed yet). Hopefully, I have attached these pics OK (this is my first post and I'm unsure of the procedure). I washed it in hot water which has tightened the weave quite a bit (it was pretty open to start with – it's more a heavy unbleached cotton than a real canvas). I think this type of thing is more like the traditional Aussie swag!
When the weather gets warmer and more predictable, I am going to oil it. After some research, I think I will use a formula recommended by “Kyratshooter” on Wilderness survival forum. He recommends using equal parts of boiled linseed oil and “mineral spirit or paint thinner” (I think this is what we call white spirit). He warns against using turpentine because it degrades the fabric (I think there may be some truth in this claim) and also says that raw linseed oil will never dry. He says that this formulation has kept some of his tarps waterproof for 15 years without the need to reproof, so it sounds pretty good.
I am a bit puzzled about the boiled linseed oil bit though. Many people warn you to stay clear of it because the makers use some pretty toxic chemicals as drying agents and advise the use of the raw product only. However, if the raw product won't ever dry properly and and will remain sticky for evermore, it doesn't seem a very good idea to use it. I may try a 50/50 mix of boiled and raw oils. It may just take a bit longer to dry and dilute any nasty chemicals. Does any one have any suggestions on this point?
 

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peter.

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Boiled linseed oil used to actually be boiled which helped with drying so would have been ok way back then. For a long time now, heavy metal drying agents have been added to the raw oil and the boiling is skipped. The original process was to bring the oil to a boil until it started to foam, then let it cool. The top layer of polymerised oil was drained off leaving the impurities behind. You can make your own but it smells terrible and is prone to exploding in flames when it's heated :-(
 
D

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Boiled linseed oil used to actually be boiled which helped with drying so would have been ok way back then. For a long time now, heavy metal drying agents have been added to the raw oil and the boiling is skipped. The original process was to bring the oil to a boil until it started to foam, then let it cool. The top layer of polymerised oil was drained off leaving the impurities behind. You can make your own but it smells terrible and is prone to exploding in flames when it's heated :-(

This takes me back to my apprenticeship peter. We used to boil linseed from time to time. It was actually one of the workshops better smells compared with things like scotch glue and timber bleach.:vomito:
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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Hi Oldigger,

The project looks great so far; (and your pictures have attached correctly).

It will be good to see how you progress.

Thanks
 

oldigger

Les Stroud
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Thanks Aussie123. I will weigh the swag before and after, as it will probably take up a fair bit of oil. I will then test it out on a cold night (in my back yard initially) to see if it adds a bit of warmth to my Italian wool blanket. It should do, as it should trap some dead air.
I don't know about home boiling linseed oil though. I had a bit of experience as a safety officer many years ago and I remember some horrible reports about people getting killed/burnt in unattended chip pan fires (usually when people tried to carry the flaming pans outside and spilled burning fat or, even worse, threw water into the pan). It might work in an electric deep frier though. With a thermostat and cover it could be a safer way and it could be heated (preferably outdoors) for several hours. I wonder if this has ever been tried?
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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I'm no expert, but I'd try it outside with the lid off.

I think the issues will be getting the oil too hot, and a build up of volatile fumes.

Also consider doing it in several small batches, rather than one large batch – easier to control ?
 

Gnome!

Russell Coight
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Have been impressed with so much info in here and some great links as well. I'm now looking at some canvas from a dead swag in a whole new light :)
 

thejungleisneutral

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Resurrecting an older thread since I've recently put together a traditional swag kit for a bushwalk later in the year.

It consists of canvas swag, leather straps, down sleeping bag, surplus sleeping bag liner, ww2 groundsheet, hutchie, mossie net, warm jacket (not shown), spare shirt (not shown), dilly bag

Here's a walkaround:

IMG_20140324_235854.jpg
Everything rolled up and dilly bag attached

IMG_20140324_233954.jpg
Swag laid out ready for use

IMG_20140324_233824.jpg
Swag open, showing sleeping bag. Despite having a good selection of vintage 100% wool blankets, I'm using a down sleeping bag for this walk for the weight and bulk savings

IMG_20140324_234038.jpg
Arctic sleeping bag liner carried for use as a palliasse mattress cover

IMG_20140324_234152.jpg
Groundsheet

IMG_20140324_234255.jpg
Hutchie and mosquito net in case of wet weather and critters

IMG_20140324_233141.jpg
Detail of strap hook - allows the use of one of the swag straps as a shoulder strap. Made from No. 8 fencing wire in the traditional manner

IMG_20140324_235721.jpg
Dilly bag. Hangs off the shoulder strap as a partial counterbalance for the swag. Holds tucker, billy, pannikin and plate.

Everything else I'll be taking will fit in a shoulder haversack.

dungalla-swag.jpg

A pic of the Dungal Swag

wolseley-valise-pattern.jpg

A diagram of a swag like mine from Ron Edwards' Bushcraft 3

Sorry about the amount of photos, I couldn't fit everything in one shot in my tiny living room.
 
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nifty

Lofty Wiseman
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Ive never seen a traditional swag in detail before, Only read about them. Thanks for showing the breakdown of its contents. The diagrams from the bushcraft book are cool too:malefico:,
 

Ol Grumpy

Les Stroud
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Gives meaning to the saying...

'Snug as a bug in a rug...'

:clap : clap : thumb
 

Mountainwalker

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Resurrecting an older thread since I've recently put together a traditional swag kit for a bushwalk later in the year.

It consists of canvas swag, leather straps, down sleeping bag, surplus sleeping bag liner, ww2 groundsheet, hutchie, mossie net, warm jacket (not shown), spare shirt (not shown), dilly bag



Here's a walkaround:

Nice one, I'm in the process of creating a similar setup with a terra rosa gear traditional woodcraft swag. First outing this week, I have basically the same configuration you have, although I might try a traditional wool blanket instead of a sleeping bag as my first outing is on a motorbike so weight and baulk not a major factor.
 
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Adrian

Russell Coight
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Tomato…….Tomato. Heres a thing I found only a couple of weeks ago,

http://www.oregonbedroll.com

I have a B&W Redgum double and its great for sleeping in but a pain in the ar$e for everything else;
very big
very heavy
has its own shelf in the shed

In my opinion it couldn't be any further from a traditional swag than a four post bed.

The products in the link above seem much more conducive to bushcraft and being able to get away from vehicles and still have shelter excites me more as time passes.
 

thejungleisneutral

Walkabout
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I've got a "proper" swag too, with zippers and mosquito net and foam padding. Way too heavy and bulky for bushwalking and it'd be cruel to even strap it onto the back of a horse.

My traditional swag comes in at just over 7kg with all bedding and shelter options as seen in the pics, so it's not the lightest weight item out there either. We have a bunch of lighter weight oilcloth "biker" swags made in Australia and don't forget the Terra Rosa Gear Woodcrafter's Swag, which is another great traditional design which is lightweight and suitable for on-foot adventuring.
 
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