BushcraftOz | The Australian Bushcraft Forum

This is a sample guest message. Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Bloody hell, considering changing shelter AGAIN.

Shane

Lofty Wiseman
Joined
Jun 26, 2011
Messages
126
Reaction score
0
Alright I started to wonder today and next thing you know I was seriously annoyed and undecided.

I currently have a tent. It weighs in at about 4.5 pounds, had to lose my old bivvy because I developed some claustrophobia. It's decent, about 4 feet high and can sleep 2. Has a vestibule and is nice enough that I am comfy and can fit my gear. It has no fly and whilst it's been treated and does fine in the rain, I can't imagine it doing well in a downpour as it's a cheap tent. I pack the tent, a sleeping bag (which is very light and warm) a reusable space blanket(negligible, rolls up with the bag) and a self inflating mat (which is pretty compact.). It works but weighs a bit and takes up quite a bit of room.

I have a hammock with mozzie net, stopped using it a while ago. I have a silnylon tarp but it's only 5' X 7' and I am 6'5'' so it's not big enough for much.

So I was considering a larger ripstop tarp, mozzie net and just my bag and thermal blanket. I can gather litter for bedding and can use the tarp for multiple things which is good. There's no multi-use to a tent other than the poles really. My issue with this setup is wet weather, not that there's much to worry about back home which is where this set up would be used. Mozzie net should keep the nasties out, should have enough room for me and gear. A decent fire and reflector should make it alright in colder climates. However, a rip stop tarp is pretty heavy on it's own. The setup would likely be just as bulky as what it is now as well.

Other option is the hammock and a tarp. Again with the bag and the thermal blanket. Sucks in cold weather but the rest of the time is alright. I can rig it to use on the ground but again, not so great if the ground is or gets wet. It has more options than the last one though, takes up the same room really. Can't really manufacture bedding though unless I carry some bags for leaf litter to toss into the hammock - more room and weight used.

A sil-nylon tarp of reasonable size would be great but they are pricey. A big enough tarp of course can be folded into a shelter (add that to benefits of the tarp set up) but I am a big bloke so maybe that's not so helpful. A sil nylon tarp likely wouldn't be too great on the ground in the wet anyways.

I could try and lose my rain jacket and use my poncho, but it's not very big either. With my rain pants it would bareable - and I could add the small nylon tarp I already have to make a decent shelter, but that's a lot of dinking around.

I would like to cut weight and bulk and have something adaptable and versatile. I need to be less dependent on gear and more adaptable myself, without risking killing my dumb ass in the freezing cold night.

Any insight on this would be great, I am going to thinking this over for days now.

Oh - am also trying to cut my entire kit back and manage to get away with a day pack for even 3 days stay and such. My current pack is big and heavy.
 

Moondog55

Walkabout
Joined
Jun 9, 2011
Messages
0
Reaction score
2
Location
Geelong Victoria Australia
What shape/configuration is the current tent? Material/?? tent poles?/
I always like to keep my groundsheet totally separate from my shelter but that's just me.
I agree with you that 5*7feet is too small for a decent shelter, that size is for emergency use.
"Dinking" around is what bushcraft is all about tho LOL
 

Shane

Lofty Wiseman
Joined
Jun 26, 2011
Messages
126
Reaction score
0
hi-tec_v-lite_2.jpg


130438684297900900.jpg


Ah here we go, complete break down:

http://haroldsky22.multiply.com/photos/album/237/Hi-Tec_V-Lite_Tent_2
 

Moondog55

Walkabout
Joined
Jun 9, 2011
Messages
0
Reaction score
2
Location
Geelong Victoria Australia
Sort of super bivvy sac/bothy bag, those can be more than a little claustrophobic.
OK then what do you want your new shelter to do? how long is you bit of string in this instance and what is the heaviest you are willing to pack?/
As you will know but which bears repeating as the grams go down the dollars go up, so carrying a few hundred grams more can save you quite a lot of money.
I haven't had to buy a tent in years but I know I will have to soon, so helping you may help me in my search.
I still use a generation 3 Megamid, and they are up to generation 7 now
 

Wentworth

Bear Mears
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 9, 2011
Messages
2,698
Reaction score
166
Location
Blue Mtns
Hennessy Hammock's diamond flysheets are either a 5 by 7 foot or 5 by 8 foot rectangle, pitched as a diamond to provide asymmetrical coverage. It's a tight fit but does keep you dry when rigged correctly. Maybe worth a try, save you buying something else. If you tie the tarp ropes below the hammock suspension, it should do well.
 

Templar

F. C. Selous DSO
Joined
May 5, 2011
Messages
2,923
Reaction score
12
Location
Vietnam/Brisbane
Hmmm...

How about a poly tarp and mozzie net with a thermal blanket and bag set up? Yes the poly tarp is a bit heavier than a silny, but it is cheaper and allows for a few different configurations that the silny won't...

Something like Dave's old Versa Shelter idea:

http://video.neighborhood21.com/vide...-Shelter-Part1
http://video.neighborhood21.com/vide...Shelter-Part-2
http://video.neighborhood21.com/vide...3-More-Options
http://video.neighborhood21.com/vide...n-More-Options

Mind you being a shorter bloke I don't tend to have the problems others do with postage stamp sized tarps... I have used the Hootchie and mozzie net set up for years myself and found it to work pretty good for me in the Aussie bush and while off in other lands of a more hostile nature, as it has some gromets in it made to tie the mozzie net into too...

Just some thoughts on the matter...
 

Moondog55

Walkabout
Joined
Jun 9, 2011
Messages
0
Reaction score
2
Location
Geelong Victoria Australia
With me it really depends on whether it will be a fixed camp or a walking trip, I like my comfort and will happily use a bigger tent in a base camp.
I have one of those old Paddy Pallin japara wall tents I like for base camps. I like to use it with a huge flysheet and an A-frame pole at the front. A tent advertised as a 4 person walking tent is the right size for 2 as a base camp
 

Shane

Lofty Wiseman
Joined
Jun 26, 2011
Messages
126
Reaction score
0
I found by switching the bag and the pole on this tent I can cut about a pound out of the weight. I gave it some more thought and it is a great tent, plenty big enough, not too heavy and I don't have to worry about rigging something odd. It's not multipurpose though but who knows, last thing I need to do is buy more stuff right now - I can't bring it all home with me.
 

Shane

Lofty Wiseman
Joined
Jun 26, 2011
Messages
126
Reaction score
0
Explain that once more? My carry on will be a lot of my gear (that's allowed) and my knives and what not will have to be normal luggage.
 

Walker

John McDouall Stuart
Joined
Jun 13, 2011
Messages
578
Reaction score
6
Location
NSW
It seems you’re having a common philosophical debate that most bushwalkers have concerning the gear/weight ratio?

It comes down to how much you’re willing to spend, the prevailing climate/weather, and the degree of protection and comfort you’re after = the cost, the use, and the season.

I value protection and comfort to be paramount. Comfort because after several days of little sleep = unpleasant experience and the likelihood of injury caused by fatigue.

It’s not easy for people of large stature, as most tents and rucksacks aren’t made that long or high, and when they are, they’re obviously heavier.

The ‘weekend’ weight of a pack doesn’t vary much if a trip goes for 3-4 days, as the equipment essentially stays the same – food is generally light weight stuff (no tins, little moisture, not much pre-cooked meat except in cold weather where is keeps longer)

Over the years we’ve found that a standard weekend pack weight for us is about 38lb (17kg).

That includes everything except for what we wear – note: we don’t carry knives/map cases/water bottles, etc on our bodies as they inevitably get caught up on scrub.

A few people can fit this into a day sized pack, though I personally like the usefulness of a large pack e.g. at night in cold or wet conditions, or exposed situations with wind, I can put my feet into the emptied bag and keep dry/warm. (Especially if camped under a rock overhang ‘camping cave’).

Rucksack quality is paramount in Oz – the bush is a rough place on gear. Having tried English, Kiwi and Australian rucksacks, the Oz ones come out in front, with the Kiwi ones not that far behind. (I use a Western Oz made Wilderness Equipment Karijini – bloody bombproof thing, and the lid can be removed and used as a large bum-bag. At about 3kg it’s not light, but it will last the distance.)

Another good day/weekend pack is also made by Summit Gear – again, a canvas one.

The harness is the single most important thing on a rucksack = stability, comfort, movement, and ventilation.

A mate is about 6’8” and he tends to use a large flysheet (from a 4-man tent). Be aware that all flysheets aren’t the same – the cheap ones will let a spray of fine water through in a downpour, so it pays to get a good one and use some sealant, such as Nikwax, on it as well.

Protection from wind is important as it washes a lot of heat away, so in cold weather the fly can be dropped low, even a second fly could be carried to cover one end – still lighter than a tent.

We all prefer alloy tent poles or live trees to using on-site timber poles – cutting green wood in the bush (usually National Parks, etc) is a no-no, as too is using foliage as bedding.

Besides, time is better spent collecting water and dry firewood. Also, inclement weather may make finding the right bits of wood a hassle.

So, again it comes down to cost, the use, and the season:

Option 1:

Just carry a tent (preferably a double walled one), sleeping bag, ground sheet, and mat. This will suit all purposes – cold and hot climates, any weather likely to be experienced.

Option 2:

2 tent flys with guy lines attached (pegs and poles are optional)
1 length of light rope
Mozzie Net (optional)
Ground sheet (don’t use a wet poncho/coat to lay on)
Sleeping bag
Mat (foam is lighter and more durable but less comfortable)

Option 3:

Go native = not that comfortable or enjoyable, but REALLY cheap!


Enjoy experimenting and making the decision!
 

Shane

Lofty Wiseman
Joined
Jun 26, 2011
Messages
126
Reaction score
0
Alright, jumped in the deep end today and blew $100 (American, ouch) on a sil nylon tarp. Weight 1 & 1/2 pounds, nice gain. 12 by 12 feet, looks like the hammock will be back in action. I will be rigging a system to combine the hammock and tarp as a tent as well so I have options. The hammock has a closed mozzie net so it seems like a great solution.
 

Shane

Lofty Wiseman
Joined
Jun 26, 2011
Messages
126
Reaction score
0
Yeah, the economy down there is pretty spectacular. I always get asked about cost of living and so on and so forth - but when it comes down to how much someone makes an hour, Australia looks pretty darn good.

Minimum wage here is still around $8/hr. A $100 tarp on that pay?
 

Moondog55

Walkabout
Joined
Jun 9, 2011
Messages
0
Reaction score
2
Location
Geelong Victoria Australia
It's all relative, we pay far too much for housing compared to the rest of the world, Melbourne and Sydney are now more expensive than London, at least one third of wags go to rent and mortgages can soak up even more, by the time you get here the median house cost will probably be almost half a million dollars, maybe even more.
Our wages at the minimum may be high but so are our taxes, and don't forget out 4 tier tax system, the one the GST was supposed to replace. If you like a cold beer learn to home brew
 

Wave Man

Pyromaniac
Joined
Jun 22, 2011
Messages
2,866
Reaction score
1,272
Location
Brisbane, QLD
have a look at the Darche Hybrid tent(1 person), here's one on ebay, repetitively cheap too for what it is ($87 including post)
http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Darche-H.../140578794079?pt=AU_Tents&hash=item20bb262a5f
stats
Size: 1 Person
Weight: 1.6kg
Pack Size: 38 x 12cm
Warranty: 2 Years
**Free Camp Pillow
I have had my eye on one of these for awhile, tho I had the opportunity to get a small 2person tent cheap (weighs 1.9kg and cost $12 for Kmart)so the Hybrid has gone on the back burners.

I also found this 2 man(1.9kg's)hikers dome tent on ebay
http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/OZTRAIL-.../330411911478?pt=AU_Tents&hash=item4cee15a936
there are plenty of good deals on ebay.
 
Last edited:
Top