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Diy cotton hammock for heavy folks

glennaeichmann

Russell Coight
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Aug 22, 2022
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I have been looking for a cotton hammock for full time sleeping. The one I have is about 60 inches wide and I need more space to hang comfortably.
Would it be cost effective for me to try to make my own cotton hammock to get like 78 inches width? Also the canvas fabric is rough on my skin and hair, so can anyone recommend a better fabric option?
I am pushing 300 lbs so something sturdy would be ideal. I use a 9ft stand by vivere. Thanks in advance!
 

Wentworth

Bear Mears
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Hi Glenneichmann,
I've made about a dozen DIY hammocks since 2005 and the most comfortable by far was this thai hammock design:

The directions give quite a short hammock, so I recommend starting with 6 metres of fabric.
I used the 2oz ripstop nylon sold in Spotlight, which minimised the stretch with two layers and made a very comfy bed.
The spotlight bolt of fabric is about 5 foot, so the same width as your current hammock, but you might find this design allows you to lie on more of a diagonal.

The ripstop was breathable and a foam pad could be put in the layers for insulation, though not as comfy as an underquilt or my DIY insulated hammocks, it did the job well.

This design gave a flatter result than the gathered end designs I've made too.

Let us know how you go.
 
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