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I don't get it.. Do you??

pap11y

Richard Proenneke
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Ok I get the basics and it seems like a clever idea...

They say remove potatoes and replace soil.. What stops the soil from all falling down from above though.

Also it seems like it would be a challenge to get the soil back in once done..

Has anyone done anything like this..? What are your thoughts on the idea?

DOg7b8.png
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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I don't know, but I guess they are relying on the root structure and the soil's natural clumping ability to hold it together enough not to collapse ?
 

pap11y

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I don't know, but I guess they are relying on the root structure and the soil's natural clumping ability to hold it together enough not to collapse ?

Yep thats logical.. It would be a great way to have spuds in the yard...
 

elof_alv

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Potatoes grow along the roots of the plant. I guess this contraption forces the plant to grow up and by adding soil the main root is going upwards rather than spread.
This way the potatoes are compacted into the box, and as they wrote, you can actually harvest them without killing the plant, thus have more and easily accessed spuds over longer period.
I guess that at the end you could just lift the box and push the plants down to have your final harvest and clean box ready for next go.
 

Ben Dono

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I'm guessing you just pack it back in and screw the few boards off... ( pretty much what everyone else has said!)

The trick with spuds is to let a bit of the plant grow, then cover up the new growth with more compost/soil. The old term for this is called 'hilling potatoes'.
Me neighbour uses this method but with cyclone mesh fencing. She just makes a cylinder a fair bit bigger than a 44 gallon drum and about 1.2m high and plants the potato in a mound of rich compost and soil. Once the plant it very well established, she piles on straw to block out the light and repeats this until the end of the season and the cage is full.
When she spills open the cage, the potatoes come out looking like they have been washed!

I do like the idea of this system though. If you don't have a root seller,( not really needd in OZ) you can just pick some of them once a month..
 

Howling Dingo

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Not sold on this....But spuds and sliverbeet are the two most easy things to grow other that weeds.
 

sami12

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i have grown them directly in my raised vegie beds, they grow well. but i have heard of another way was with tyres stacked up and hay and soil mixture to keep it light. after a month or two you take a few tyres off harvest and then stack and pack again.. less permanent and easier than making a timber structure.. (growing in a soil vegie bed is simple and you get a ton of potatoes)
 

Aussie123

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Potatoes grow along the roots of the plant. I guess this contraption forces the plant to grow up and by adding soil the main root is going upwards rather than spread.
This way the potatoes are compacted into the box, and as they wrote, you can actually harvest them without killing the plant, thus have more and easily accessed spuds over longer period.
I guess that at the end you could just lift the box and push the plants down to have your final harvest and clean box ready for next go.

Aaaah of course .... you add the extracted soil to the top, so you end up with an ever increasing gap at the bottom !
 

Qually

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I have used the stacked tyres method and got a ridiculous amount of spuds out of 8 tyres. That method is also very easy to harvest and restock. This method is the same but more awkward I'd say.
 

Howling Dingo

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I have used the stacked tyres method and got a ridiculous amount of spuds out of 8 tyres. That method is also very easy to harvest and restock. This method is the same but more awkward I'd say.

Now on my to do list..
 

peter.

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I wonder if sweet potato will do this (I can't eat regular potato).
Time for some research and hopefully expand my sweet potato crop
Thanks....
 

sami12

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These are my potatoes in the raised vegie beds. About one and a half foot tall.
Wine glass for scale
 

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AussieBosun

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i have also used the tyre stack , it doesn't get much easier , just push the stack over when there ready , collect the spuds and start again.

p.s. , also saves on the tyre disposal fee when you get new boots fitted to the car and your also recycling
 

Jeepcreep

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Tires packed with straw has been used for years,the wooden box is the same thing.Some folks plant spuds in trenches with only straw or mulch ( no dirt ) simply pull plants up gently by the stems at harves time for clean dirt free spuds.
 

Bloffy13

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I'm becoming a huge fan of square foot gardening.
They have a method where they plant the four eye spuds in a square bucket approx one foot square by about 18-24 inches high.
I am yet to try this.
As they bush up, cover with dirt and new spuds sprout off the root. Wait until reaches top, allow to die back a bit, tip out on a tarp, harvest the spuds, add some starter compost, put the dirt in a second bucket and repeat the process.
If you work it right, you have a constant supply of spuds from just one bucket of spuds and one of dirt. would be interesting to try the straw for a cleaner growth medium.
Would need to keep the water up, I think.
Cheers
Bloffy
 

Jeepcreep

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Yup,with the straw,you need a good water source,and yes,sweet potatoes are good candidates for this type of gardening
 

maysfire

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I'm becoming a huge fan of square foot gardening.
They have a method where they plant the four eye spuds in a square bucket approx one foot square by about 18-24 inches high.
I am yet to try this.
As they bush up, cover with dirt and new spuds sprout off the root. Wait until reaches top, allow to die back a bit, tip out on a tarp, harvest the spuds, add some starter compost, put the dirt in a second bucket and repeat the process.
If you work it right, you have a constant supply of spuds from just one bucket of spuds and one of dirt. would be interesting to try the straw for a cleaner growth medium.
Would need to keep the water up, I think.
Cheers
Bloffy
A mate of mine does this system in those round plastic garbage bins...has a couple on the go all the time and the spuds he gets are top grade and very clean when harvested. the compost he uses seems to be very straw based, (though he has a few horses so there's probably a fair bit of their by-product in the mix!!) Seems like a great way to go...
I'll have to ask him about how much he waters them...atb..Paul
 
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