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lean to and tepee

Ash

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Hi. Here is a couple of shelters me and a mate whipped up in one afternoon whilst out on a walk. They were only taken with my phone. Sorry if the pics arnt that good


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Blake

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Great pictures ash. I find pics like this really usefull. In the typial australian open forrest and mostly elsewhere we dont have those big broad leaves for thatching that they get in other places so we need to comprimise. Did you sleep under your shelters? I would be interested how the thatching holds up in a downpour.

Thanks for posting Ash.
 

Ash

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No we didnt sleep under them unfortunatly. It was just a day trip. Not shore about a downpour but light rain they would be ok. We started at the base and worked our way up. Wedging the branches, leaves, bracken and brush in as we worked them. Once we reached the top we went back to the bottom and did another layer. That way the rain would run down the direction we layed them with only a minor amount of water getting in. Probably would have to put a few more layers on to make it stand up to a downpour.
 

Howling Dingo

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Nice work cool pics..!!Thanks for posting mate.
 

Graham

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Hay Guys Just thought i would put some pics up of some shelters i done.They were both done late in the afternoon a last minute thing and i did not have much light left.As you can see the one i done in the forest was just a branch i wedged up in the tree then i lined the end with dead sticks the i layed more green branches over the top then covered it with pine needles blends in really nice from a distance.The second Shelter the (lean to) was just a very basic shelter that i made in the bush near were i live.
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ozbladefan

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Excellent work there Ash & Graham well done. How long did they take to get built, any plans for sleeping in them?
 

Ash

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It was a while ago now when they were built. Went out to see if they were still up last week. They were, but the thatch was pretty dry. I dont think I'd want to put a fire near them. We've had snow here and a lot of -degree nights. So sleeping out for me at the moment involves a tent and sleeping bag. But in spring we'll build some more, mabe a different style this time and we'll defenetly sleep in them. Cheers
 

Graham

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The Designs are pretty straight forward the tepee in the first post took a few hours because it was dark and there was not much vegetation about so it was slow going lol. But my other shelters took about 30 to 40 min.

I just build a shelter when i go out to relax for an hour or 2 and cook up a good meal :).But opposed to Ash when i go camping next i will be sleeping in a shelter rather than a tent i think with the tents we have a good water proof shelter will be much warmer in these cold conditions. (May still take sleeping Bag)
Thanks Graham
 

Bartnmax

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Got caught out in the mountains one night when deer hunting about 20 years ago & had to sleep overnight in an improvised shelter.
I have always made a point of carrying 2 thermal blankets with me. Used one under the debris cover to waterproof the lot & t'other around me to retain heat (with some debris underneath for a little padding).
Was pretty cold & stiff the following morning but far less so then if I'd not had em. Managed a small fire in the morn to warm up by & make a quick cuppa & was back at the car by 10am. Definitely not a night I'd recommend anyone spend willingly in those conditions but a very good learning experience none-the-less.

Bill A.
 

auscraft

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The Designs are pretty straight forward the tepee in the first post took a few hours because it was dark and there was not much vegetation about so it was slow going lol. But my other shelters took about 30 to 40 min.

Graham has several extremely important comments here about the debris shelter that is the time it took due to the quantity of vegetation available. the second the time he actually tried making it. And the designs were simple.

Debris shelter are Temp shelters if used for long periods they require a lot of maintanence. they require plenty of materials to be gathered and even though simple in design you must leave time to construct and gather. the shelter needs to be made from materials that are readily available to you
both ash and Graham the shelters you made look great
 

Moondog55

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makes me want to geet out and try my hand. After the fires around here over the last 3 summers there just isn't any debris left on the ground to play with although there will be a lot of dead saplings after this summer ( I won't of course pull up the live stuff just to practice) but it is making me rethink how the locals must have built their shelters 20,000 years ago ( BWM ) Before White Man.

As far as I am aware the local people made no permanent shelters unlike the populations in the Western District who had masses of basalt rocks that were easy to manipulate
 

Templar

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The other thing to remember when constructing field expedient shelters is the 1:3 rule...

That is, put 1 foot (30cm) of insulation under you and 3+ feet (1+m) above you to make the shelter warm and water resistant, watch out for the ribs too, if they bend or have branches running off they will divert rain into your shelter if the overhead is thin in places, to make one of these properly takes a couple of hours work.

If you dont have time to construct a frame, just make a really big pile of leaf duff and crawl in, even if it's wet it will keep you warmer and alive if stuck out overnight.
 

Corin

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I have not built a natural material shelter in years... Pretty slack really. Good work guys, I would love to see some pictures on here of a full on couple of night camp out in a shelter like these, preferably in bad weather. OPK fellas the challenge has been set.
 

Blake

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Way back as a younger bloke I slept in debris shelter and was very warm and mine wasn't build as well as you can make them. If you have access to alot of leaves you can really get it well insulated almost like it was down.

I wonder what a good strategy for a shelter would be if it were the dead of winter but you didn't have access to that amount of loose leaves. I suppose grass would be an option. Maybe a circular shelter with a fire in the centre.

I saw these videos a while ago which is sort of like what we had but not as good:

[video=youtube;myghxFyf6e4]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=myghxFyf6e4[/video]
[video=youtube;Lf3AXl-OCAo]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lf3AXl-OCAo&feature=related[/video]
 

J.K.M

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@ Ash & Graham: Those are some great looking shelters, well done and thanks for posting your pics. Natural shelter building is something that I have spent very little time practicing; but those photos have really motivated me and next time I get out I know what I'll be doing...
 

Bartnmax

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One thing that is highlighted from Ash & Graham's endeavours I believe is the time factor involved.
'Practice' aiside, I'd dare say no-one would be building a debris shelter unless it was an absolute necessity (if there were no other form of shelter immediately available). What is critical under those circumstances is the ability to make a decision to start building the shelter within a safe time frame.
It is very easy to leave the making of that decision later then it should be, thereby jeapordising both the building process & the success of it.
I believe that when faced with a situation whereby it may be necessary to build a shelter of this kind you should be prepared to make that decision with at least 2hrs of daylight left with which to work. Leaving it too late could not only make the chore much harder but also potentially dangerous in searching for suitable materials in the dark. There comes a time where you have to say "time to stop travelling & time to start building". Trying to cover just that little bit more ground could be disasterous IMO. That small amount of distance you might have covered in the time you should have been buidling your shelter will not take a great deal of time to make up the next mornng, but if you leave the building of your shelter too late then the next morning could potentially not come, or you could find yourself seriously injured by the time it arrives.
What it all comes back to is being decisive with your bushcraft startegy (in general & not just in relation to shelters, etc).
It's far better to have built your shelter & have plenty of daylight left to relax/start fire/cook/eat, then to try to cover that little bit more distance & find you've run out of time for safe building.

Bill A.
 

Moondog55

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The other thing to have regard for is the total lack of debris in some areas,after the fires went through the Brisbane Ranges with ferocity it will take at least a decade for any depth of debris to build up.
Australia isn't like the Northern hemisphere where they have huge stands of deciduous trees that drop all of their leaves at the same time.
 
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