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Nulla nulla

Askew

John McDouall Stuart
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I've been starting to research a bit about Aboriginal tools, and thinking about making some. So when I was clearing some weeds recently I kept a piece of appropriate size and made this. The names I'm aware of are nulla nulla, waddy, and buundi. They were used for hunting and fighting, the point could be used for digging, and I'm sure there are other uses. It should be clear that I'm far from being very knowledgeable here.

PXL_20210531_002042608_copy_756x1008.jpg

I carved this with a hatchet and crooked knife, and should probably fire harden it. It does a good job of hitting things, seems to work well for digging but want to wait till the woods dried out a bit more before doing too much.
If anyone knows more about these I'd love to hear about it.
 

Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
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I've been starting to research a bit about Aboriginal tools, and thinking about making some. So when I was clearing some weeds recently I kept a piece of appropriate size and made this. The names I'm aware of are nulla nulla, waddy, and buundi. They were used for hunting and fighting, the point could be used for digging, and I'm sure there are other uses. It should be clear that I'm far from being very knowledgeable here.

View attachment 28369

I carved this with a hatchet and crooked knife, and should probably fire harden it. It does a good job of hitting things, seems to work well for digging but want to wait till the woods dried out a bit more before doing too much.
If anyone knows more about these I'd love to hear about it.
I believe these were/are used as clubs in fighting but were/are also used as a throwing stick for hunting.
Keith.
 

Kindliing

Ray Mears
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Looks like it would be a good club for knocking Animals on the head to finish them off provided it’s heavy enough .
 

Randall

Richard Proenneke
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On some pacific islands (eg Vanuatu) where there is high rainfall and deep rich soil, long pointed sticks are used for digging / gardening. Just did a search for a picture; supposedly SE Australian aboriginals also used digging sticks (see below); short ones and long ones. I imagine SE Australia for the same reasons, higher rainfall and softer ground, although for foraging?

The one below I can't tell if the less pointy end is flattened - some were pointy one end, flat (like a skinny spade) the other end. See bottom picture, also SE Au aboriginal.

I'm also guessing that the ends at least were fire hardened?

digging stick.jpg

digging stick double ended.jpg
 
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Askew

John McDouall Stuart
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Looks like it would be a good club for knocking Animals on the head to finish them off provided it’s heavy enough .
This one isn't particularly long or heavy, but I tried hitting a 1.5L water bottle with it, and managed to burst it so it works as intended.
 

Askew

John McDouall Stuart
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On some pacific islands (eg Vanuatu) where there is high rainfall and deep rich soil, long pointed sticks are used for digging / gardening. Just did a search for a picture; supposedly SE Australian aboriginals also used digging sticks (see below); short ones and long ones. I imagine SE Australia for the same reasons, higher rainfall and softer ground, although for foraging?

The one below I can't tell if the less pointy end is flattened - some were pointy one end, flat (like a skinny spade) the other end. See bottom picture, also SE Au aboriginal.

I'm also guessing that the ends at least were fire hardened?

View attachment 28372

View attachment 28373
Digging sticks were used all throughout Australia as I understand it, and could be short or up to about 1.5m long depending on the area. From what I've read they were women's tools and were used for digging, getting animals out of burrows, and fighting with.

Almost forgot to add, the one I made has started to split along the handle, which I thought might happen given its made out of privet. If it gets too bad I'll toss it in the firewood pile, and maybe make another at done point from a different type of wood.
 
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