Overnighter with gear reviews: CapCap/Hammock suspension/ScotchEyed Auger/stove stand

Taplow

John McDouall Stuart
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I snuck off last night after dinner for a dose of bushcraft, just a 30 min walk form home to a spot off the beaten track to hang my hammock and have a quick brew before bed.

I’m currently using 1L Nalgene widemouth bottles for water, mainly because I’ve been given a Steripen with a filter which screws onto these. They are easy to fill but annoying to drink from as the opening is too wide and if I’m walking at the same time I spill a lot on myself. Recently saw a solution on-line – CapCaps which replace the original lid and incorporate a second smaller lid which is much more convenient to drink from. This is a real improvement and they are well-made.

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Note to self: after filling, ensure both lids are properly screwed on. I lost 500 ml of water into my Swiss Mountain pack ,which pooled in the bottom which is thick leather. My first aid kit was soaked but fortunately my hammock was sealed in snakeskins and my tarp was easily shaken out. My sleeping bag was tied on top and remained dry, so I still had a good night out. Nothing wrong with the cap, I’m just not used to checking two lids!


I use the descender ring method to adjust my hammock suspension , because I like the speed and adjustability. However, I’m bothered by the fact that others, esp Swampy, have pointed out how this can lead to rope damage and failure. To avoid having to replace the ropes on my Hennessy, I’ve just tied on similar rope to each end, close to the hammock (Ropes for Ticket To The Moon Hammock, $11 on eBay, at least visually very similar). This sacrificial extension now bears the brunt, and will be cheap and simple to replace. It gives a minor weight increase but it also extends the distance between trees from which I can hang.

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Next I had a go at making some camp furniture. I recently came across videos on YouTube showing Scotch Eyed Augers, which drill holes in wood large enough to fit legs on a seat for example. The eye allows you to slide in a suitable stick for turning leverage. I cut a log from a recently fallen she-oak, flattened one side with my axe and then drilled 4 holes underneath. It was easy to trim some legs to fit from smaller branches. Despite the odd angles and bends, it was remarkably stable and a big improvement on sitting on the ground to cook. The possibilities are endless.

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Finally I tested a wire stand with a Trangia-clone stove for boiling some water. I'd been given this set by a friend who apparently got them for a few dollars on-line.

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The stand is light and both items seem well-made. The stove is very similar but a little less well finished than a real Trangia stove. However, the stand holds the cooking vessel too close to the stove so it never primes, and I couldn’t get a boil. In the end I held my pot a few inches higher above the flame for a minute or so to get a rolling boil – not ideal. I guess it can be modified, but it's not easy to pack anyway.

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Wentworth

Bear Mears
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Taplow, that is awesome! The auger looks like a handy bit of gear to have in a pack.
 

Taplow

John McDouall Stuart
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Taplow, that is awesome! The auger looks like a handy bit of gear to have in a pack.
Thanks Wentworth. It is a bit heavy (200g) but given the potential for different projects I would take it on a hike.
 

Taplow

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Thrud

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Brilliant! What a very clever idea to use the auger, was it easy to use on the she-oak?
 

Tas

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Great report taplow , I've wanted to try a few furniture ideas myself , I'll be ordering an auger for sure. A table to match would be perfect and you could do a brew in the morning without leaving the hammock .
 

Mozzie

Richard Proenneke
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For just a night out you did well on your bush crafting, like others say about that mini auger, it looks real neat, never seen one that small, only the old fashioned long shank ones my great grandad had. On a side note we have them widemouth bottles and they are a pain drinking from while walking BUT a small trick, get a straw cut it in length, leave it in the bottle, screw on lid and off you go.

mozz
 

Taplow

John McDouall Stuart
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Brilliant! What a very clever idea to use the auger, was it easy to use on the she-oak?
Actually, sawing the log, carving the top and drilling the holes was a bit of work for that late in the evening. I had expected the she-oak to be easier than a dried piece of gum I'd practiced on at home but it was probably more difficult, maybe as I didn't have a vice and the angles were awkward.
 

Taplow

John McDouall Stuart
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On a side note we have them widemouth bottles and they are a pain drinking from while walking BUT a small trick, get a straw cut it in length, leave it in the bottle, screw on lid and off you go.

mozz
Why didn't I think of that!?
 
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