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Bird Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus)

auscraft

Henry Arthur Readford
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Scientific Name: Falco peregrinus

Common Name: Peregrine Falcon

Order: Falconiformes

Family: Falconidae

Other Names: NA

Distribution: across Australia, but is not common anywhere.

Habitat: rainforests to the arid zone, and at most altitudes, from the coast to alpine areas. It requires abundant prey and secure nest sites, and prefers coastal and inland cliffs or open woodlands near water, and may even be found nesting on high city buildings.

Field Notes: large, powerfully built raptor, black hood, blue-black upperparts and creamy white chin, throat and underparts, which are finely barred from the breast to the tail. The long tapered wings have a straight trailing edge in flight and the tail is relatively short. The eye-ring is yellow, with the heavy bill also yellow, tipped black. Although widespread throughout the world, it is not a common species.
body length of 34 to 58 centimetres and a wingspan from 74 to 120 centimetres.
The Peregrine is renowned for its speed, reaching over 322 km/h (200 mph) during its characteristic hunting stoop (high speed dive), making it the fastest member of the animal kingdom. According to a National Geographic program, the highest measured speed of a Peregrine Falcon is 389 km/h (242 mph)
Source http://www.birdsinbackyards.net/species/Falco-peregrinus
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peregrine_Falcon

View attachment 12057
Brooya State Forest
 
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Greatbloke

Jack Abasalom
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Peregrine falcons carve out scrape nests rather than build stick nests. ...usually on a high cliff, or on tall buildings.

On the 33rd floor of 367 Collins Street Melbourne, there have been five pairs of falcons since 1991.
 
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