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Redback everest boots

Randall

Richard Proenneke
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Actually I only remembered later that the terra combat boots I mentioned were also made by redback . its not a conspicuous fact on the boots .

I wondered if the soles went through different phases , trial and error in the time being made , as I have noticed slight hardness differences in a couple pairs .

There is at least a couple different tread patterns .
The boot leather consists of kangaroo hide snd buffalo which I do like the leather, and the seatbelt looking strap sewed to the sides . The first time you realize they make no attempt to stop water coming in is also pretty wild , it just gets out quick too, theres little drain holes with mesh on them looks like they can be plugged?
On a hot north queensland day the outside leather can change back to being completely dry walking through grasses in around a half hour sometimes.

There would be more expensive better lasting boots out there for sure . They did not seem to get it spot on , and I don’t think anyone would write home to say how great they are .
They do grip and they do support .

About those zips , never had trouble with one ,knock on wood . Whatever the great big zips they are using are , they should go ahead and use them on a lot of other items out there .
Your army boots sound like a vast improvement to what I used. Mine had woefully soft uppers; no support at all in the heel area. It was an attempt to stop sore foot injuries (blisters, pump hump etc). They were responsible for a lot of soft tissue injuries (torn ligaments and tendons - sprains and strains). And to make it worse, the army supplied dubbin for those boots - that made them even softer. The leather would stretch to eventually leave you with loose boots; in the interim they didn't give much support. I still have black parade boots of that era - much tougher. Unfortunately they covered the leather with shiny black stuff that doesn't breathe - this keeps the water out but locks perspiration in. The pic below is what I had, although a tan colour.

army boots.jpg
 
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Kindlling

Les Hiddins
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AA66331B-95E3-4607-AB39-4A85CAD56EBF.jpeg
Here is the redback terra boots next to some lymington pacific ‘ADF Cadet’ boots .

The cadet boots have a tread that picks up pebbles well , so you often click clack as you walk .
Not particulary comfortable , a good pair of sole inserts would greatly improve them. Good enough to stop snakes around a lazy camp .
Cost around 40$ on eby so thats great value and a good backup pair stored . I don’t want to spend 800$ on boots a year , so these surplus boots suits me .

I think 100 years ago we would not be so fussy , I am no boot aficionado. If you are normally a 13.5 order a 12.5 in the cadet boots the sizes are huge.
 
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Kindlling

Les Hiddins
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9D4DB8B2-7F0F-4609-A9BC-B5FE37921CD7.jpeg
A couple different soles on the terra boots .

If you get a blowout like me in one air sole just poke the silicon gun in and give it a few squirts then jump up and down until it evens out and gtg again when it dries.

You may notice it in town , in the bush It is rough enough .
 

Boot wearer

Russell Coight
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I’ve actually been a big fan of Redback. For near 20 years I have worn the Redback UBOK as a work boot and still do however for hiking I wear actual hiking boots. I’ve got Meindl and Scarpa hiking boots. When I saw Redback advertising the Everest as a hiking boot I thought great I will give it a go since I’ve had such a good run with the UBOK. Man was I wrong ! They are NOT a hiking boot, they don’t even make a good work boot, they are too uncomfortable and just completely wrong. Redback really need to go back to the drawing board and review the materials used and the actual design and construction. I’m no expert in boot manufacturing but I am an expert in wearing boots so I feel adequately qualified to make such comments. I would love to see Redback improve the Everest but good luck getting anyone there to listen, in fact good luck even getting through to someone. Their approach to customer service and after sales support leaves an awful lot to be desired. Something which seems to be common with other Australian businesses which you try to support. So if you want comfy work boots - Redbacks are great but if you want proper hiking boots then stay well away from the Everest. For what it’s worth this has been my experience with these boots and this company. Thanks
 

Randall

Richard Proenneke
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The cadet boots have a tread that picks up pebbles well
yeah, a close tread like that is really better for hardpack, rock, asphalt etc :ROFLMAO: (my mtb experience is showing here). The old pair of redbacks I had resoled have a sole that pattern, and the rubber is hard as nails. Insoles have really changed them for the better. I wear mine for urban use or when I want a challenge on steep tracks - it really improves my balance, sliding on two feet. Incidentally, on steep descents 99% of folk fall onto their bums - this is because they are not over their feet, but leaning back. Put your knees directly over your feet with more weight on your toes. Just like vehicles (bicycles, motorcycles, cars etc) the front is where all the grip is on steep descents so that's where you want more weight for better traction. I can walk down stuff that fellow experienced bushwalkers slide down their bums on. I do try to explain to them, but they don't have the mtb / motorcycle background.

I am into boots. I love the versatility of them - I can be socialising then walk home 10 or 20km if I have to, and through bush. I can do 30km, but I won't be happy for a few days :D. I always have my daypack and basic kit in it too for this reason.

I've had bone growths on the back of my heel from old school boots in the early days. I've had to cut a piece out of one pair of blundstone lace ups in the middle of an isolated off track hike in the kimberly ranges (El Questro land). Back then I used to carry a sewing awl and thread, so I was able to mend the stitching where I'd cut the hole.

I do have an expensive pair (well $350 zamberlains) of boots for extended (heavy load) hiking. They will last forever. The other biggy with purpose made european hiking boots (not US made), is the lack of stitching on the lower part of the boots - minimal seams. Those everest boots are of that design. This is for rock in mountainous country which abrades stitching instantly. The inseam sides of the boots get abraded a lot while climbing. We have predominantly dolerite here - so many hikes I've worn out the finger tips of gloves on dolerite while climbing and finished with bloody fingers.

Those tera boots look like they have lots of support and a good open tread that will still wear well.
 
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Kindlling

Les Hiddins
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“I've had bone growths on the back of my heel from old school boots in the early days. I've had to cut a piece out of one pair of blundstone lace ups in the middle of an isolated off track hike in the kimberly ranges (El Questro land). Back then I used to carry a sewing awl and thread, so I was able to mend the stitching where I'd cut the hole.”
Randall.

Good point , a lot of boots with a lining wear out the soft lining inside in the heel area.

As with a lot of things , more parts , more things can go wrong . The old blundstones lace ups I think were all leather no liner and hard on the feet inside , so thats a compromise Durability and extra comfort .
About you walking 20 - 30 km , I walk everyday in boots kms .often twice a day .not that far a destination .
And when in the bush it is more hours and may not particularly be far a distance from camp though there may be a lot to do working / camping around an area . Sometimes all day.

That probably reflects in my choice of shoes , they get wet and muddy often , sometimes moldy in the tropics on the shelf etc .

I do like boots too , and lean towards durability over comfort a little .
The old wear thicker sock and harden up feet.
Here is some oliver RT’S .

Brand new boots a workwear shop sold me for 30$ , they said they were ‘out of date’.

Not sure what out of date means for workboots . You can see how they fell apart first day never left the house .

Just a brand new boot sat on the shelf too long?

Near 200$ boots when ‘in date’ whats that say .

Can see some sikaflex and tyre / tube in their future .

B6E4E8E4-2C04-4453-8872-62BEA2FB0591.jpeg
 
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Randall

Richard Proenneke
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Boots from the 60's, 70's and even the 80's were just what they were. They were tough and hard. They were the days when you had to "wear boots in" and where dubbin was used for good effect. You would have heard how army dudes wore their boots in - soak new boots in water and detergent, put them on still wet and wear them. I imagine that was to shape the leather to your foot rather than the other way round. There isn't really any "wear in" needed with newer boots in my experience.

If it is going to be wet, especially over ankle deep, I wear cheap but good fitting runners. Just stomp through the middle of the water and not worry about it. Easy in, easy out. Goretex and the like will just hold water in when it's that wet.

Track to Adamson's falls :D

adamson's falls.jpg
 
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Kindlling

Les Hiddins
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When I hear hiking , I think mountains and hills . I reckon john bull made good boots when I had a pair I really liked years ago , they were high side , metal eyes were strong , no frills no lining just tough .
The kiwis know all about big hills ,
They have a model called kokoda .
Looks a bit like a workboot hiking hybrid , looks the part anyway.
Don’t how how good they are these days , don’t see them around here , or what the exchange rate is now.
 
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Randall

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I don't think NZ has a lot of rock up high like we do. When I think of NZ I think of gum boots :D.

The highlander 2 looks like a good hiking boot, similar to the everest (not for heavy weight - day trips). I think a friend of mine may have a pair bought from a hunting shop here - I remember him saying they were popular amongst Kiwi hunters. Well, NZ hunters (not hunters who hunt Kiwi's :rolleyes: )
 
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Kindlling

Les Hiddins
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Josh James the kiwi bushman is part mountain goat in some of his youtube vids .
So had a look and he recommends https://www.lowaboots.com.au/blogs/pro-team-hunting/josh-james

Though I have seen him get sponsored before .
Don’t think he would recommend crap .

Gum boots haha . Yes I have gumboots too good for quickly throwing on while you go have a chat’ to a snake .

Must be nice to be a kiwi btw , where you can go barefoot and walk around or sleep on the ground and nothing is going to really bite and kill you .
 
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