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Reproofing Oilskin

gelandangan

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Thanks for posting this! I know it's been up for a while, but I just got around to Bunnings a to get some linseed oil. Trouble is, I got "Pale Boiled Linseed Oil, with added drying agents" instead of "Raw Linseed Oil".
Anyone know if this will make a difference when using for oilskin rather than wood treatment?
.

Raw linseed oil take a LONG LONG time to dry, boiled type dry a lot faster, even faster yet if it have drying agent.
Now "faster" is a relative term, a coat of normal BLO usually take about 4 - 6 days to dry, drying agent may make it to 3 - 5 days.
Whereas the raw version may take 2-3 weeks.. depending on the temperature humidity and many other factors.

It is not for the impatient :aspetta:

Beeswax mixed in would made it dry MUCH faster maybe down to 1 to 2 hours..
But the oilskin usually ended up much stiffer as well...
And if you beeswax has sweet smell, you may attract insects (and girls :non sono stato io: :eek:kkiale: :_capelli:)
 
D

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Just an amendment on this recipe. If you are using beeswax, you need to add a fair bit more linseed oil to the mix. Works great then.
 

Blake

Nest In the Hills
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hey Blake great tutorial !!!!

were did you get your oilskin?


Hi mate.

Bought it from an RM Williams store about 5 years back. its a 3/4 jacket so longer than a normal jacket so it covers you hips but not a full length drover style coat. Your legs will get wet if its chucking it down but its a bit lighter and more suitable for hiking imho.
 

dre

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I love my driza bone but it is nearly always to hot to wear it up here. Mine is also a 3/ 4 with the split at tg back for riding . Would this still need doing every year if it doesn't get much use
 

Steve McFadden

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Hi, I know the thread is a bit old but still relevant to many off us. Has anyone tried using lineseed oil without any wax added?. I was over at the Diggers site to check the MSDS of the linseed oil to see if I could spot the drying agent. The website and product data sheet both mention using it straight as a waterproofing for wood and sporting goods. Also talks about how to minimize the stickyness of the coating.
Steve
 

don shewring

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I have a full-length oilskin coat which had mould, I have got rid of the mould by washing with water and vinegar, one cup to a small bucket of warm water, it looks good but needs resealing. I am doing the resealing with the abovementioned recipe and will lwt you know how it goes. Thanks for the information.
 

Blake

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Just a follow up on this tutorial. Beeswax is definitely better. I can get it raw and by the Kg cheap here in Mudgee as we have a number of apiaries and one just up the road but you can also find it all over the net. Ebay is a good source as well. Heaps cheaper if you can find it local though. This store on ebay sells it filtered and from 50g to 5kg.

Has a bonus of having a lovely mild honey smell and is definitely less 'cracky' then paraffin.
 

Sleeper

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This thread started a fair bit ago but I'm glad that it's been revived! Pretty much it's the thread that got me interested enough in this forum to join it. To be sure, the commercial products available to reproof oilskin are IMHO more than a bit pricey. My interest was definitely piqued when I found numerous DIY recipes. In the past, I've used mixtures of bees wax, linseed oil (boiled) and mineral spirits (turpentine) for refinishing wood rifle stocks but never gave a thought to using those readily available materials for reproofing oilskin. I guess I just didn't know much about oilskin. Now I know a lot more! RE: the cost of the DIY components, honeybee issues (colony collapse disorder for one) in the U.S. has led to a reduced supply of bees wax. Simple supply and demand economics are certainly partly responsible for higher costs. I guess I need to see how much bees wax I have in my workshop. I'll probably stock up just on general principles.
I do have to say that when I get around to "brewing" up a batch of reproofing cream, I'm going to back off on the candle wax. Not too fond of the white waxy residue once it dries. The bees wax does have a sweet smell but the turpentine overwhelms it for the most part. I believe that odor does dissipate over time.
When I was discussing this topic with my wife, she mentioned that she had seen a post on Pinterest (I think) about using using jojoba oil instead of linseed oil and leaving out the turpentine to make reusable, non-toxic, food wrappers. Interesting.

Anyway, thanks go to Blake as the OP getting this thread going and all that have kept it active.
Sleeper
 

Edward

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This thread started a fair bit ago but I'm glad that it's been revived! Pretty much it's the thread that got me interested enough in this forum to join it. To be sure, the commercial products available to reproof oilskin are IMHO more than a bit pricey. My interest was definitely piqued when I found numerous DIY recipes. In the past, I've used mixtures of bees wax, linseed oil (boiled) and mineral spirits (turpentine) for refinishing wood rifle stocks but never gave a thought to using those readily available materials for reproofing oilskin. I guess I just didn't know much about oilskin. Now I know a lot more! RE: the cost of the DIY components, honeybee issues (colony collapse disorder for one) in the U.S. has led to a reduced supply of bees wax. Simple supply and demand economics are certainly partly responsible for higher costs. I guess I need to see how much bees wax I have in my workshop. I'll probably stock up just on general principles.
I do have to say that when I get around to "brewing" up a batch of reproofing cream, I'm going to back off on the candle wax. Not too fond of the white waxy residue once it dries. The bees wax does have a sweet smell but the turpentine overwhelms it for the most part. I believe that odor does dissipate over time.
When I was discussing this topic with my wife, she mentioned that she had seen a post on Pinterest (I think) about using using jojoba oil instead of linseed oil and leaving out the turpentine to make reusable, non-toxic, food wrappers. Interesting.

Anyway, thanks go to Blake as the OP getting this thread going and all that have kept it active.
Sleeper


I want to make up a batch of that wax too. I am using 100% natural linseed oil, not boiled as it has metals in it. I mix this with pure gum turps and the other products mentioned. I want to add tung oil and Kanubra wax for durability, but latter is expensive.
 

Sleeper

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I want to make up a batch of that wax too. I am using 100% natural linseed oil, not boiled as it has metals in it. I mix this with pure gum turps and the other products mentioned. I want to add tung oil and Kanubra wax for durability, but latter is expensive.
I thought about the "additive" issue with the boiled linseed oil vs the raw (i.e. no additives) linseed oil too. I've read that the raw linseed oil takes MUCH longer to dry. I'm not sure of the health impact of the BLO but I'm suspecting that unless you are creating your oilskin from scratch and sewing the fabric into a garment, the original oilskin on manufactured products most certainly was made with BLO instead of the raw linseed oil and you've already suffered from any possible exposure. Just sayin'.
Sleeper
 

Edward

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I thought about the "additive" issue with the boiled linseed oil vs the raw (i.e. no additives) linseed oil too. I've read that the raw linseed oil takes MUCH longer to dry. I'm not sure of the health impact of the BLO but I'm suspecting that unless you are creating your oilskin from scratch and sewing the fabric into a garment, the original oilskin on manufactured products most certainly was made with BLO instead of the raw linseed oil and you've already suffered from any possible exposure. Just sayin'.
Sleeper



Yes I know what you mean. I read that too, and I use to use boiled linseed oil. But since watching a few reviews, I decided to go 100% natural and have been for a few years now. If you mix it with the right amount of pure gum turps drying time is fine. Its also cheaper than boiled. I have only recently started researching fabrics, so I cant comment on them.
 

Sleeper

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Well, since the Summer is nearly here in the Northern Hemisphere, my Kakadu 3/4 length oilskin coat will be living in the closet for several months. I'll start thinking about this again in September 😉. I think that most everyone will appreciate a posting of tried and true tweaks to the basic DIY oilskin "re-proofing" mixture. With the Winter on its way "down under" and the record breaking climate extremes we've all been experiencing Worldwide, getting our oilskins in top form rides high on many To-Do lists. I'll be looking forward to the latest and greatest recipes👍. Thanks
Sleeper
 

wongankatta

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The original post mentioned not being able to source Pine tar . I have used Stockholm tar which can be found in many stock feed suppliers and is used as hoof dressing for Horses. I also use pure gum turpentine instead of mineral turps - it costs more but smells better.
 
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Kiwisailor

Les Stroud
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Bees wax is often available at Health stores and Gum Turpentine (smells lovely) is available at Paint Shops and Ship Chandlers.
It is a Paint additive/thinner for Oil paints.
 
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