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Sleeping arrangements!

AusTac

Les Stroud
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Hey guys first offical post on this forum!

Just wondering what you guys do for sleeping, i've traditionaly stuck to a bivi and tarp with a dodgy blue mat thing underneath, but i'm in the market for one of those fancy hammocks they look pretty cool and easy to set up! What are your experiences with your own hammocks/bivi bags? Which do you prefer? I guess im just after a smaller package for sleeping gear, The bivi,tarm,sleeping bag, cordage etc etc ends up taking alot of pack space! There must be a better way..

Cheers!
 

Benny

Richard Proenneke
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Hi AT, I'm hammock fan myself. If it's bulk you're trying to cut down on I don't think a hammock is the answer unless you're spending most of your time in warmer climates. As soon as it gets cold you basically have to carry 2 sleeping bags to use 1 under & 1 in the hammock. As far as I'm concerned it's worth it but you'll also have to take your size into consideration, most hammocks are designed for average folk but there are options for bigger blokes.
 

AusTac

Les Stroud
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Ahhh fair point mate, i've heard they can be a bit chilly on the underside. And warmer climates.. i wish! Im in sunny old Melbourne, it must be nice being up of the ground though, While were on the topic who uses ex-army auscam hootchies? Spend many miserable under one of those.
 

Wentworth

Bear Mears
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Hi Austac,
I use a hammock with a down filled top quilt and underquilt. They all go in a drybag about the size of my pack, along with my hammock and clothes. This means that there's no dead space, which tends to happen when you get 3 or 4 stuffsacks trying to fit in a pack. Could you use the bivi as a drybag, sqush your sleepingbag in it then squeeze out all the air and jam it in the bottom of your pack?
 

Benny

Richard Proenneke
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Im in sunny old Melbourne, who uses ex-army auscam hootchies? Spend many miserable under one of those.

You'll definately be wanting an underquilt then. Yeah I've given the old hootchi a work out. Great for light load & bivi camping but a bit small for hammock coverage though. There are plenty of options, most hammock manufacturers make tarps as well.

The most popular are DD & Hennessy, there are others that are apparently better but you pay for them. I've recently tried a Hennessy Exped but I personally prefer the DD Frontline for a few reasons. The fabric is more comfortable, the mozzie net set up gives more space & keeps it completely out of the way, you can flip it over & use it without the mozzie net, they are cheaper than Hennessy but don't come with a rain fly.

The fly that comes with the Hennessy isn't worth using as it's so small, IMO, so you'd likely buy another anyway. The Hennessy Hex fly is a winner though.

Check em both out here- http://amtcgear.com.au/products_results.php
Jeff's service & prices are great, he also does package deals with the DD stuff.
No affiliation.

They all go in a drybag about the size of my pack, along with my hammock and clothes. This means that there's no dead space, which tends to happen when you get 3 or 4 stuffsacks trying to fit in a pack. Could you use the bivi as a drybag, sqush your sleepingbag in it then squeeze out all the air and jam it in the bottom of your pack?

Fair point with the larger dry bag, though there are 2 reasons I prefer several smaller dry/compression bags, first is it's easier to find what you're looking for, better organisation, second is if by chance (even though it's a small chance) a dry bag gets compromised only the stuff in that one bag gets wet. The rest of your kit is still good to go.

I recon that's a cracker idea using the bivi bag as dry storage for the sleeping & hammock kit. That way if you have to spend the night on the ground you've got waterproof ground option with the bivi since while most hammocks can be set up on the ground they are not WP, plus you wouldn't need a ground sheet. I like it, bivi bag on the shopping list for next month. I've been umming & arring for a while.
 

AusTac

Les Stroud
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I used to set my bivi up back home with my roll mat and sleeping bag and just roll it up and put that in a big bag and chuck it on my pack, works a treat! but i used that for a light load when i was fairly confident there was no rain on the way, i know bivi's are ment to be waterproof..but i don't know if i trust it
 

Walker

John McDouall Stuart
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I usually use a MacPac Microlight tent (about 1.6kg) combined with a ground sheet, thermal mat (either foam and/or thermarest) and a down sleeping bag. Used everywhere - even had a metre of snow fall on it up at Mt Jagungal, I awoke and couldn't focus because the ridge of the tent had deflected that much that the ridge pole was about a centimetre from my nose - I simply belted off the snow and it sprang back into shape and it hasn't failed to protect since.

If in an area with lots of overhangs, I leave the tent and camp under these - a bit cool in winter but okay if positioned correctly.

Doing the ultralightweight thing, I use a goretex bivvy bag - not my favourite bit of gear but is perfect for winter or extreme weather - even used it out in the western desert under the stars - performed perfectly.

That reminds me - gotta get a silnylon custom tarp job done - put a verandah on the microlight just for extra protection in foul weather.
 
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