Utilitarian fishing kit?

Folcwigga

Russell Coight
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I have no interest in sport fishing, but recognise that as a survival skill fishing is one of the most useful to have. I also see from wandering around Kmart and some other stores that stuff like hooks and line is cheap as anything. So for someone looking to assemble a small fishing kit that packs down small, and can be used for bushcraft purposes, what would you recommend as vital to have, and stuff that is not vital but could be useful. Also how would you go about using it?

Cheers,

Matt
 

hillbilly

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Rather than normal fishing line, braid fishing line would be a better choice and is extremly strong and very fine, feels like thick cotton. Very handy for tieing things other than fishing. line and hooks is all you need.
 

Folcwigga

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Like i said, i'm coming from a position of ignorance. What's braid fishing line?

Also i notice they sell lines with all different breaking strains, is this relevant for our purpose here?
 

koalaboi

Ray Mears
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Braided line needs specialised knots...go to a fishing site like fishraider.com.au and check them out.

That being said, I reckon a basic kit would use:

1. Line: 10 to 12lb braid would be good with a min of 50m
2. Hooks: get a range of styles: from nr 12 long shanks for catching bait up to 1/0.
3. a small range of sinkers and maybe a few rings.

You can make floats using twigs etc.

Fresh (preferably live) bait is always the best!

KB
 

darren

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Mate, i would buy a small handline fishing kit from Kmart for a few bob then go down to your local expanse of water and catch some fish. Apart from the fact that your outside and its enjoyable you will learn something.

Then once you have the skill assemble you kit from what you have learnt, Then if you lucky enough to be in a 'survival 'situation you won’t just have a kit that you read about on the net you will have a skill
 

Folcwigga

Russell Coight
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Mate, i would buy a small handline fishing kit from Kmart for a few bob then go down to your local expanse of water and catch some fish. Apart from the fact that your outside and its enjoyable you will learn something.

Then once you have the skill assemble you kit from what you have learnt, Then if you lucky enough to be in a 'survival 'situation you won’t just have a kit that you read about on the net you will have a skill
Hey mate, i didn't mention a survival situation, i was looking for some kit that would be light to carry and could be practiced with ion any downtime whilst out in the bush. I didn't even know Kmart did a handline kit, i'll look into it on my next visit.
 

Folcwigga

Russell Coight
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Braided line needs specialised knots...go to a fishing site like fishraider.com.au and check them out.

That being said, I reckon a basic kit would use:

1. Line: 10 to 12lb braid would be good with a min of 50m
2. Hooks: get a range of styles: from nr 12 long shanks for catching bait up to 1/0.
3. a small range of sinkers and maybe a few rings.

You can make floats using twigs etc.

Fresh (preferably live) bait is always the best!

KB
Sounds good. I'm still unsure what braid is but i'll look at that site you mentioned.

Also, what would be the best way to use this stuff? Set up some hooks and leave them or some sort of minimalist fishing approach?
 

Folcwigga

Russell Coight
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No worries, we just seemed to be talking at cross purposes. :) As said, i'll look into the handlines next time i'm in Kmart.
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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Here's a common sort of handline you will find KMart and many fishing suppliers:
Handline.jpg

I'm not a fisherman, but there are generally limits on the number of hooks (usually 1 or sometimes 2), even the number of lines you're allowed to use.

You will also need a fishing license for each person fishing.

All the regulations are state based and may differ between freshwater and saltwater, and in various Parks etc .....
There are size limits and bag limits (number of fish you can catch) too ....

... best to ask a local fishing supply shop what the local restrictions are.
 

kiwibro

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look up flurocarbon on ebay. I use 6-10lb. can get a 200m spool for about $10
fluro carbon has the same refractive index as water.
a good point to know is the lighter the gear you use the more bites you will get.
in lake macquarie i use 6lb flurocarbon on a hand spool with a running sinker rig.
catches bream flatties whiting luderick snapper.
almost all fish species in australia will scavenge from the bottom so a running sinker rig allows the simplest assembly.
 

Folcwigga

Russell Coight
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I must have missed the handlines, or maybe they just didn't have them in the store i was looking in (Bondi junction). I found 250m of 20lb mono for $4 and the same amount of braid for $20. Hooks were cheap as chips, but they came in all different styles - suicide, worm, bait, etc - which were meaningless for me. I assume the different types of hooks wouldn't be that important for a handline or a line tied off and left?

Aussie123, i'll look into the laws before i buy the stuff or plan any fishing. I've heard in the NT you don't need any permits to fish though?
 

Totumpole

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I must have missed the handlines, or maybe they just didn't have them in the store i was looking in (Bondi junction). I found 250m of 20lb mono for $4 and the same amount of braid for $20. Hooks were cheap as chips, but they came in all different styles - suicide, worm, bait, etc - which were meaningless for me. I assume the different types of hooks wouldn't be that important for a handline or a line tied off and left?

Aussie123, i'll look into the laws before i buy the stuff or plan any fishing. I've heard in the NT you don't need any permits to fish though?
I'm fairly certain you don't need a fishing permit here in the NT. Not sure about restrictions on numbers of hooks/handlines. One drawback with handlines is needing to carry bait. I'm looking at getting a small telescopic rod and reel so all I would need to carry is some lures. I might give dried meat a go as bait some time for convenience of carrying.
 

Bloffy13

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I'm with Folwicca. I know very litgle about fishing. But I went to my local camping shop and picked up some Gulp long life bait. I think it's impregnated plastic or similar. I've had it for about two months now and used only one third of one piece of bait which I still have after two smaller fishing trips. It lasts a good while and seems to work. I also carry a few lures, a packet of mixed hooks, a few sinkers, a couple of floats and a collapsible rod with a small reel. It seems to work so far. Also don't forget the fry pan. I've learnt the hard way that I don't like to kill anything that I'm not prepared to eat.
Good luck mate but I agree with the above about practice makes perfect. I've got a lot more to learn.
Cheers
Bloffy
 

Michael

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I would not use bread on a handline it is very thin a can cut into your hands very easly I use the suicide hooks send me a pm and I will make you up a pocket hand line
 

kiwibro

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Mono is best for hand lines. 10 lb will get you a feed. 20 lb + if your after a photo worthy fish. Braid is handy to have in your pack as it makes very strong thread. If your after a kit for a ' oh crap I'm hungry and stuck in the middle of nowhere' moment then half a dozen size 2 long shank hooks 50-100 meters of mono and some power bait will get you a feed.

Edit: learn the uni knot. Is probably the best knot in terms of can be used in almost all situations with most types of line.
 
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ozbushy

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I would agree with mono or fluorocarbon for a tag along fishing kit, braid doesn't handle rubbing or abrasion as well as the other 2
 

koalaboi

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Fishing has been a passion for mo for over 40 years. Mostly salt water shore based.

All members of this forum should fish for it is an easy survival technique to master and a hell of a lot of fun besides.

As to a small kit and ideas for having a go out in the bush, here's my thoughts:

Line: fluorocarbon, monofilament or braid?

Fluorocarbon is strong for its diameter, springy, easy to tie knots with and the clear colour an advantage.

Mono is good, a little less strength than fluorocarbon, springy, but more stretch good for knots too.

Braid is incredibly strong and so you can have very light thin lines which cast well but tangle well too. Braid is limp and floats with zero stretch which makes it very sensitive when fishing by touch. As a handline I'd be worried about it cutting my fingers. It's not clear so you need a trace of mono or fluoro to tie to the hook so that fish don't see it. Braid is also very expensive. Braid also requires certain knots which are a bit more complicated than those you'd use for mono and fluoro. Attaching your nylon trace to a braid mainline needs a special knot. They are usually shown on the packet when you buy it.

All round I'd go fluoro or mono. Mono being the cheapest. You're looking at getting a feed not catching a record so 10lb line or thereabouts would be my choice.

Hooks? Again if you're just after a feed, I'd go no bigger than a 1/0 and probably a couple a bit smaller.

In the bush your baits are most likely going to be dough, bread, worms, grubs, crickets, grasshoppers etc. You might throw on a live yabby or make a lure out of a sinker and some feathers, bit of tin foil as well etc. Throw it out and pull it in...vary the rate and action.

In the saltwater, local shellfish, bread, dough, worms (earthworms go well surprisingly). If near weedbeds in the estuaries, tiny shrimp can be easily caught in the weed and they are a deadly bait. If near green weed and luderick are known to be in that area, throw some of that on with a tiny split shot crimped about 30 to 40cm above the hook (nr 8 to 10) and let it drift with the tide. You could make a float out of a thin stick. It'll float horizontally but stand up when a fish is on the bait. Luderick gut is a deadly bream bait too.

Catching live poddy mullet is easy with a clear plastic bottle and a bit of bread. Great bait for all sorts of things!

Finally, you'd be surprised at how many fish will move into shallow water that's dry at low tide looking for a feed on the flood.

KB
 
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