Wax for canvas Help with recipes?

Moondog55

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Well it seems that no-one currently has stock of the wax I need to finish my rucksac.

I have been out in the shed and I have used all my beeswax for a red tinted furniture polish so I can't use that.
Any recipes out here for using Soyabean oil and parafin wax as I have some of that.
If I can't find wax i guess I'll have to use diluted silicon, at least I have plenty of that.
 

Templar

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When I wax my haversacks and the like I just rub the wax into the cloth and then hit it with a hair drier or leave it in the sun to melt in... it's never failed me yet... even here in Vietnam during the monsoons my gear is still dry... just pay extra attention to the seams and she's all good... water just beads straight off.

I got the idea after reading about "Greenland Wax" used in some of the upper end out doors gear in Scandinavia which uses a waxed cotton...

See here: http://www.bushcraftstuff.com/tutorials/homemade-greenland-wax/

http://www.bushcraftuk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=53277&page=1
 
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Moondog55

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I did read those.
I usually use the Joseph Liddy Dry-Seal but everybody is out of stock here, I then read that a lot of yanks use soya bean oil and I have some of the stuff for cooking Japanese food.I really need to do a decent survival shop; we are out of candles after the last power outage a year ago ( Thnx HOON driver ) Next time I see real beeswax for sale I'll buy a few hundred grams.
I'm pretty sure tha dryseal is just Greenland style wax with silicone and turps added
 

Templar

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I think pretty much any oil mixed with wax will work so long as it is stable & won't go rancid...

In the 18th century they made "Painted" tarps, Haversacks and Surtouts (rain shirts) by painting the item with a mixture of Linseed and "Lithage of Gold" which is just Iron Oxide... basically it's just iron oxide paint we would use for painting timber today.... 2 coats and it was completely waterproof... I've tried it out a few times and it does work, but i just don't like the colour at the end... generally red in colour.
 

Bartnmax

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If your after JL 'Dry Seal' then I'd suggest heading along to a Horse saddlery.
'Horsey people' use it all the time for WP-ing their canvas rugs. Given the size of the race horse industry most Saddleries usuallty stock a pretty good supply of it.
I've recently bought it on several occasions from 'Lowden's Saddlery' in Kilmore.

Bill A.
 

Moondog55

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Can't afford to spend $120- on petrol to buy a $20- product, we have lots of horses and therefore horsey shops here in Geelong but none of them stock Dryseal. Werribee the same when I called the shops in the yellow pages.
 

Templar

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Here's a soy oil based waterproofing agent... it makes a waxless "Oil Cloth"

To make your own waterproofing formula, mix 8 fl oz of soya bean oil and 4 fl oz of turpentine. In a medium container, mix the two liquids well. This formula can be poured into a squirt bottle for easy application, or a sponge or cloth can be used to spread the liquid onto the canvas. You can also use a paint brush or paint roller to apply the solution. The recipe for this waterproofing is for one application, but it is recommended that you let the first application dry and then re-apply.
Found it here: http://www.essortment.com/yourself-waterproof-canvas-12182.html

Option two:

use Linseed oil, but I make it more flexable with a large infusion of bees
wax and for color I include a good shot of Burnt Umber Oil Paint.
In a large coffee can, heat up (very carefully and outside) a quart or so
of linseed oil until it will melt a coffee cup size piece of bees wax and
sqeeze a 4oz tube of Burnt Umber Oil paint into the mix. Stur well and let
cool a bit. It will be thined with paint thinner or other thinning medium
off the heat just before it is applyed to your fabric.

..... Now thin the still warm oil/bees wax mix about 50/50 with
the thinner and pour some into a roller pan. With a long handled roller,
completely saturate the fabric, turning it over to get good saturation in
all layers. Hang it to drip and dry in a sunny location and it should be
close to usable in a week or so.

The more bees wax you use the more flexible it will be. I have a ground
cloth that wraps around me and is a bit bigger than a Whitney 4 Point that
has been on the ground 5 or 6 times a year for the last 5 years and is still
in one piece. It is made of 108" muslin and is probably too lite for a tarp
but would work if need be.
Found here: http://www.xmission.com/~drudy/hist_text-arch4/msg02123.html
 
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Moondog55

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Thanx Templar
The waxes part of it is easy, keeping the waxes flexible looks like it is due to the different ratios of beeswax in the mix.

Terebine looks like it hardens the wax too much but it may be an option if I use an oil like soya.
 

Moondog55

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So I stole a beeswax candle from SWMBO and used a half a dozen citronella tea-lights to make my own Greenland wax.
Third application of yellow wood stain and it is now a wonderful dirty olive green in colour ( olive drab if you prefer )
 

Bartnmax

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Can't afford to spend $120- on petrol to buy a $20- product, we have lots of horses and therefore horsey shops here in Geelong but none of them stock Dryseal. Werribee the same when I called the shops in the yellow pages.
If you're in Geelong then try Ray's outdoors. They definitely did used to stock it as that's where I originally bought it from.
Also, I'd think the saddelries should be able to get it in for you easy enough.
It's a fairly standard product used throughout the horse/racing industry.
I dont know any saddlery that doesn't have an account with Joeseph Lyddy.

Bill A.
 

Moondog55

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Bill you know that Ray sold off the business don't you?
During the transition the new owners stopped all buying, they may or may not carry the product in the future according to the new Geelong manager.
In the end it is simply easier to make my own
 
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