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Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Thanks and it is good experiementation. Something else occured to me....as I slice of the upper layers of the punkwood the lower levels will not readily take a spark even when charred.

So next step is to powederise this punkwood with a file/rasp whatever and then char it in a tin over a fire.

The clever idea being this charred powdered punkwood will be convienent to carry in a waterproof bag on a long trek for multiple fire lights.

Later this year hopefully will do such a trek so putting a few things together in readiness.
You don't need to char tinder material in a tin Chigger, the original way was to char tinder material directly in the fire, & it still works just fine. Less bulk & weight to carry in one's pack.
Regards, Keith.
 

Chigger

Ray Mears
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Yes over a fire or at home on the gas burner is how I ignite the punkwood. Once charred and smouldering pop it into the tinderbox so as to smother the piece.

However powdered punkwood is a bit more difficult to handle and will try out the baking in a tin first.

Otherwise could put the powder into a open tin and use a gas torch to start the burning process, once burning put the lid on the tin.
 

Arwon

Malcolm Douglas
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Hi all,
Well today I have been exdtremely busy planting our land with bushtucker and natives to our area. The goal of this is to restore some of the land back to its natural habitat (we do have grazing land for cattle), grow tress which can be used for craft, and grow edible plants for use, wildlife and plant identification.

We are fortunate to have the Barambah Environmental Education Centre which is designed for school kids particpating in environmental studies and participating in projects which include knowledge of local bush tucker, restoring the forest and bushcraft skills.

So we were lucky to have a tour (we are overgrown school kids!!!!) and be introduced to the local fauna. The bonus for us was that this centre also has its own nursery and we were able to obtain many plants and will be going back for more. What a find!!!!

So if anyone is interested this is what we brought home:

Causurina Totura - Forest Sheoak
Acacia Fimbrata - Brisbane golden wattle
Acacia Podalyriifo - Queensland silver wattle
Acacia Oshcinesii
Acacia Conferta - Crowned leaf wattle
Araucaria Cunnighamii - Hoop Pine
Araucaria Bidwilli - Bunya Pine
Bankia Spinulosa - Birthday Candles
Alpinia Caerulea - Native ginger
Hibiscus Heterophyllus - Native hibiscus
Eupomatia Laurina - Ntive guava
Hardenbergia - Native sarsparilla
Grevillea Robusta - Queensland Silky Oak
Castanospermum Australe - Black Bean
Dianella Coerulea - Blueberry Flax Lily
Syzygium Australe - Scrub Cherry
Westringia Fruticosa - Coastal Rosemary
Callistemon Formosous - Kingaroy Bottlebrush
Cassine Australis - Red Olive
Podocarpus Elatus - Australian Plum Pine
Hymenosporum Flauum - Native Frangipani
Viola Banksii - Native Violet
Brachychiton Acerifolius - Illawara Falme Tree
Ficus Macrophylla - Moreton Bay Fig




Well I hope I spelt the above correctly. The plants well define the region we live in. For your information the Native frangipani is the fastest growing tree in our area. I am so excited, can't wait till the frosts are over and plant other species in the warm weather.

Will post up photos when we fully establish our bush gardens.

Dusty
A worthy project, good luck, doing the same, planting mulching watering
 

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Edward

Ray Mears
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I see people saying earlier this year the fm 78 glock knives were out of production and only the fm80 were being made, some saying on ebay only the black fm 78 being made .
I could see they were drying up just after the prices went up .

i really like mine , if i was sliding down a creek bank and needed to get a knife off my belt quick to stab into the ground saving myself and pocket contents from getting wet , knowing i would be secure and the knife probably wouldn't mind that would be the knife i would choose .

i saw you say something about spears too , and you may know they have an end cap can come out , apparently there is thread inside there to attach spear style also .

mine is on my belt today , have the sandy colored one .

Glad you like it.

I heard both FM78 and FM81 were to be discontinued. I could be missinformed, but I have asked a few suppliers, as I wanted a second one (a spare) and even they can't get them now.

From what I've seen there are far more FM81's still for sale than FM78's. IMO the reason why is the FM78 is more versatile, applies with Geneva convention combat rules and maybe 30% stronger. I tried to get a second FM78 at a descent price, I can't. You can also baton FM78, without damaging the saw back like you do on on FM81. See here..




Yes I hear the Glock knife can be attached to a spear in emergencies. I am not convinced it would hold up IMO, however. There simply isn't enough lateral strength. Its more purposely designed for bayonnet attachment to the Styre AUG, where it is supported at two points not one.

But no, the spear I made doesn't use the knife, it is a serious and dedicated piece of equipment I had to design and make myself as there wasn't anything out there strong enough I trusted myself and thats even after reading reviews of expensive spears like Cold Steel sells, and thats if you can get your hands on them.

My spear consists of a section of steel pipe (the tip) inserted into an aluminium pole (the shaft), which are then both drilled through and rivetted together - its a very, very heavy duty spear that wont fail you, IMO! I designed this spear to sustain massive lateral and penetrating forces. Not to get into too gruesome terriroy, but I designed it specifically with close quatre combat in mind, where hitting and wedging between bones may occur, as such it had to have very strong lateral and penetrating strength both on the shaft and where the steel-tip-end-section connected to the shaft. In the right weight it will penetrate a 1" thick heavy duty pine pallet crate (not pictured but I tried it), which could make it a descent fishing spear, pursuant to local laws of course. The impact force was so great, I was surprised to see it kept moving a heavy duty table I made from heavy duty pallet crates back and the target (all weighed around 60-70kg see pics), so I had to purposely build a target frame using an old heavy door and a pallet crate, I then weighed it down with 350kgs of sand bags.

For the tip I tried to find 304L stainless steel for possible marine use (also) or a second spear, then considered hardened steel for use on land, but for now I've settled on mild steel for the bush and I'm sort of glad I did now. This is because its difficult sourcing stainless offcuts than fit perfectly into the aluminium shaft, hardended steel tubing is even garder to find and drill though; and long lengths of stainless (which is all you can order) are very expensive $600+. But besides that, during testing it took some 33 throws for the tip to only slightly deform after penetrating a large VCR cupboard made from laminated chipboard 3/4" thick, and the tip is easily restored using the file, or if the damage is bad even cutting off a piece of the end using the angle grinder if you accidentally hit a rock or somthing - wow, new spear!

The only real downside I have found during testing, along with getting the balance right is the aluminium shaft gets hot in the sun! I thought this could be solved by possibly using pipe insulation or some sort of rubber coating, like bicycle inner tubing.
Here are some pictures of a prototype I made about 9 months ago (viewer discretion is advised). I am yet to build the final product, as I needed to order the alloy pipe, and the supplier forgot to do it! After some trial and error, I will get it made, ready for winter camping this year. Sure the tip isn't hardened steel or stainless, but its proved it should, if necessary, serve adequetly.

Well there you go, whats not too like - a servicable, simple but reliable spear one can make at home using average tools and dirt cheap materials. The spear cost a mere $31AUD to make. The alloy pole was $30 and the piece of used mild steel pipe was $1. Oh there was a rubber stopper I had to buy for a few bucks (I got 4) and glue on one end to protect the aluminium form the ground.
I used a rivett gun, rivets, a drill, clamps, flexible rule, sharpie and a file.

Making this spear was born out of necessity, my own experiences and talking with senior bushman. It is an essential and last resort investment for my personal security in the bush against possible and unavoidable, close quartre animal attack. SAFETY: I noticed in addition to an essential sheath and obviously sensible and cautious use, its important the spear be significantly taller than the user, to account for taking strides through the bush when walking with the spear. You definetely dont ever want to fall on it or cop it in the face.


Heavy duty, thick-walled mild steel pipe is sourced from a junk yard that snugly fits a medium-heavy guage 1.6mm aluminium pipe 6.5ft long. Aluminium shaft diameter was tested and I settled on 28-31mm for grip and this diamater is commonly available.
BMnvlChl.jpg



When inserted the two sections of pipe are then drilled through and rivetted in as shown. A plastic cap is added for a sheath (later to be PVC)
E1ANlmol.jpg



The business end is cut to a Tanto point, said to be the strongest penetrating tip known to man (see RMJ Tactical, Cold Steel etc. cavlar helmet tests). I trued up and sharpened with a bastard file, then oiled to prevent rust and applied a temporary make-shift safety cap (sheath). Its not to most efficient tip, but its simple, strong and as mentioned before, its construction has its advanatges. I dare say it will also help keep an attacking animal(s) at bay, and do more if necessary.



Testing results. This is a medium weight spear. Thats said its throwing penetration was very good. Being a bit tip heavy, it just lacked the finesse I sought for trekking. Afterall it was only a prototype I made for testing balance and tip length etc. My user bush spear will be lighter for trekking purposes and not intened for throw-penetration, but ore thrusting and close quartre combat, while still being very strong. This is my reassurance in the bush. The throwing and target practice was just for fun and fitness - and I thought while I'm still but barely young enough too, why not! ;)
XEqPplFl.jpg


Thrown from 20 feet away.
osEXi1Pl.jpg


Straight through! Most penetrated, but were at an angle. This one looked good for a picture.
oDiKl4wl.jpg


I insisted on a spear I could rely on. This spear penetrated this 3/4" thick double laminated board 33 times from memory and with startling authority, sometimes embedding into the pallet crate table behind it as well after passing through the chip board, before the tip deformed as shown, and only slightly too. I was pretty impressed but this. It must be Australian steel! After all this abuse and more, there was absolutely no play in the spear tip whatsoever. It was still rock solid. I read rivets are the strongest bonding known to man and they are replaceable. This is why I used them.
OjDP5yrl.jpg
 
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Kindlling

Les Hiddins
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Glad you like it.

I heard both FM78 and FM81 were to be discontinued. I could be missinformed, but I have asked a few suppliers, as I wanted a second one (a spare) and even they can't get them now.

From what I've seen there are far more FM81's still for sale than FM78's. IMO the reason why is the FM78 is more versatile, applies with Geneva convention combat rules and maybe 30% stronger. I tried to get a second FM78 at a descent price, I can't. You can also baton FM78, without damaging the saw back like you do on on FM81. See here..




Yes I hear the Glock knife can be attached to a spear in emergencies. I am not convinced it would hold up IMO, however. There simply isn't enough lateral strength. Its more purposely designed for bayonnet attachment to the Styre AUG, where it is supported at two points not one.

But no, the spear I made doesn't use the knife, it is a serious and dedicated piece of equipment I had to design and make myself as there wasn't anything out there strong enough I trusted myself and thats even after reading reviews of expensive spears like Cold Steel sells, and thats if you can get your hands on them.

My spear consists of a section of steel pipe (the tip) inserted into an aluminium pole (the shaft), which are then both drilled through and rivetted together - its a very, very heavy duty spear that wont fail you, IMO! I designed this spear to sustain massive lateral and penetrating forces. Not to get into too gruesome terriroy, but I designed it specifically with close quatre combat in mind, where hitting and wedging between bones may occur, as such it had to have very strong lateral and penetrating strength both on the shaft and where the steel-tip-end-section connected to the shaft. In the right weight it will penetrate a 1" thick heavy duty pine pallet crate (not pictured but I tried it), which could make it a descent fishing spear, pursuant to local laws of course. The impact force was so great, I was surprised to see it kept moving a heavy duty table I made from heavy duty pallet crates back and the target (all weighed around 60-70kg see pics), so I had to purposely build a target frame using an old heavy door and a pallet crate, I then weighed it down with 350kgs of sand bags.

For the tip I tried to find 304L stainless steel for possible marine use (also) or a second spear, then considered hardened steel for use on land, but for now I've settled on mild steel for the bush and I'm sort of glad I did now. This is because its difficult sourcing stainless offcuts than fit perfectly into the aluminium shaft, hardended steel tubing is even garder to find and drill though; and long lengths of stainless (which is all you can order) are very expensive $600+. But besides that, during testing it took some 33 throws for the tip to only slightly deform after penetrating a large VCR cupboard made from laminated chipboard 3/4" thick, and the tip is easily restored using the file, or if the damage is bad even cutting off a piece of the end using the angle grinder if you accidentally hit a rock or somthing - wow, new spear!

The only real downside I have found during testing, along with getting the balance right is the aluminium shaft gets hot in the sun! I thought this could be solved by possibly using pipe insulation or some sort of rubber coating, like bicycle inner tubing.
Here are some pictures of a prototype I made about 9 months ago (viewer discretion is advised). I am yet to build the final product, as I needed to order the alloy pipe, and the supplier forgot to do it! After some trial and error, I will get it made, ready for winter camping this year. Sure the tip isn't hardened steel or stainless, but its proved it should, if necessary, serve adequetly.

Well there you go, whats not too like - a servicable, simple but reliable spear one can make at home using average tools and dirt cheap materials. The spear cost a mere $31AUD to make. The alloy pole was $30 and the piece of used mild steel pipe was $1. Oh there was a rubber stopper I had to buy for a few bucks (I got 4) and glue on one end to protect the aluminium form the ground.
I used a rivett gun, rivets, a drill, clamps, flexible rule, sharpie and a file.

Making this spear was born out of necessity, my own experiences and talking with senior bushman. It is an essential and last resort investment for my personal security in the bush against possible and unavoidable, close quartre animal attack. SAFETY: I noticed in addition to an essential sheath and obviously sensible and cautious use, its important the spear be significantly taller than the user, to account for taking strides through the bush when walking with the spear. You definetely dont ever want to fall on it or cop it in the face.


Heavy duty, thick-walled mild steel pipe is sourced from a junk yard that snugly fits a medium-heavy guage 1.6mm aluminium pipe 6.5ft long. Aluminium shaft diameter was tested and I settled on 28-31mm for grip and this diamater is commonly available.
BMnvlChl.jpg



When inserted the two sections of pipe are then drilled through and rivetted in as shown. A plastic cap is added for a sheath (later to be PVC)
E1ANlmol.jpg



The business end is cut to a Tanto point, said to be the strongest penetrating tip known to man (see RMJ Tactical, Cold Steel etc. cavlar helmet tests). I trued up and sharpened with a bastard file, then oiled to prevent rust and applied a temporary make-shift safety cap (sheath). Its not to most efficient tip, but its simple, strong and as mentioned before, its construction has its advanatges. I dare say it will also help keep an attacking animal(s) at bay, and do more if necessary.



Testing results. This is a medium weight spear. Thats said its throwing penetration was very good. Being a bit tip heavy, it just lacked the finesse I sought for trekking. Afterall it was only a prototype I made for testing balance and tip length etc. My user bush spear will be lighter for trekking purposes and not intened for throw-penetration, but ore thrusting and close quartre combat, while still being very strong. This is my reassurance in the bush. The throwing and target practice was just for fun and fitness - and I thought while I'm still but barely young enough too, why not! ;)
XEqPplFl.jpg


Thrown from 20 feet away.
osEXi1Pl.jpg


Straight through! Most penetrated, but were at an angle. This one looked good for a picture.
oDiKl4wl.jpg


I insisted on a spear I could rely on. This spear penetrated this 3/4" thick double laminated board 33 times from memory and with startling authority, sometimes embedding into the pallet crate table behind it as well after passing through the chip board, before the tip deformed as shown, and only slightly too. I was pretty impressed but this. It must be Australian steel! After all this abuse and more, there was absolutely no play in the spear tip whatsoever. It was still rock solid. I read rivets are the strongest bonding known to man and they are replaceable. This is why I used them.
OjDP5yrl.jpg
Good idea the way you cut that pipe.
A piece of reinforced rod , like what is used in concrete slabs is really strong and pointy too when sharpened with the angle grinder .
I use them for pegging out an awning .
They have never bent even with the big hammer .

There is the black glock fm78 knives for sale back on ebay again now.

About the aluminum getting hot in the sun , if you don't mind a bit of white paint on it, that can solve that issue .
 
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Edward

Ray Mears
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Good idea the way you cut that pipe.
A piece of reinforced rod , like what is used in concrete slabs is really strong and pointy too when sharpened with the angle grinder .
I use them for pegging out an awning .
They have never bent even with the big hammer .

There is the black glock fm78 knives for sale back on ebay again now.

About the aluminum getting hot in the sun , if you don't mind a bit of white paint on it, that can solve that issue .


Thanks Kindling.

I actually considered using rio bar, the problem I had is how to attach it. And while I can weld, I don't have a welder!
I vaugely remember seeing a few people using rio bar for fishing and hunting spears. I'd image they would be much more effective than mine for that purpose. They would make an excellent fishing spear, especially with those ribs on the bar. I wonder if those rods are hardened steel or mild steel? Anyway, thanks for 're-kidling' this idea! I might give it a go oneday!

Thanks for the note on the Glock FM78 too. I was impressed you knew about these and the current market. There are a few in Oz, but there expensive now, around the $100-$130 mark. I was lucky enough to get mine for $53 from overseas. The issue I had is I initially brought 2 here in OZ, but they were flawed, so I sent them back, and brought one from overseas. I should have brought 2 from overseas instead of one the second time around, but I planned on getting one and seeing what it was like, then ordering a second. When I tried to order a second one he had sold out :eek: Oh well, I am happy I got one I guess and its perfect! This is what charletons create for us thesedays. Beware, there are a lot of delaers in Australia selling seconds knives at full prices. Ebay helps solve this, but they are on there too and although your covered, they can waste your time.

Cheers,
Edward
 

Kindlling

Les Hiddins
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Good to hear you have yours now too . Something that is built to last .
I would have liked 2 of these fm78 glocks and put a thinner edge on one to see how it goes .

Think they are 85$ and 90$ on ebay at the moment for the black ones .

I even saw they have replica ones for sale on there too like a a few other military knives these days . Thought that was funny , may as well have the real thing .

Well you must appreciate quality , and i have seen them hanging on military guys across the world before on the news as they are still used .

The spear looks good Eddie , sure it can handle any of the jobs it is needed for .
 
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Edward

Ray Mears
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Interesting, Kieth. I didn't know you used a bow.
I heard that Australian woods are not as good for bow use as those from Europe, so I am interested to know what wood you used for your bow?
As a child I once used Sheoak (you may also know this timber as being from 'Casuarina Trees' ;) for a bow. Ok for a youngster, but I wouldn't say it was suitable for hunting.
 

Edward

Ray Mears
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Good to hear you have yours now too . Something that is built to last .
I would have liked 2 of these fm78 glocks and put a thinner edge on one to see how it goes .

Think they are 85$ and 90$ on ebay at the moment for the black ones .

I even saw they have replica ones for sale on there too like a a few other military knives these days . Thought that was funny , may as well have the real thing .

Well you must appreciate quality , and i have seen them hanging on military guys across the world before on the news as they are still used .

The spear looks good Eddie , sure it can handle any of the jobs it is needed for .


Great idea, Kindling! It would be interesting to hear how the edge perfoms, especially given the punishment the tip can withstand. I mean lets face it, military field knives not the best of slicers as it is, but that is a trade off many accept for their strength and wide range of applications.

I dismissed the Glock FM-78 for years as it wasn't full tang. That was my mistake. After listening to Fernando's reviews from the 'The Modern Survivalist' channel on You Tube (see below), I reconsidered. I think the strength of this knife comes from the flexibility of the handles super polymer and the German or Austrian spring steel used in the blade.

Yes I like quality, but oftentimes it comes at a price! I remorse over the money I have spent on high end knives over the years. The Glock is a rare exception. I like the Glock for its protection factor, strength and the how light it is. I could go on for hours about the Glock FM-78 knife. It really is a case study in knife making, IMO, and somthing we may never see again, at least at its initial price.
The powers that be and private corporations like PayPal, Ebay, Amazon and Gumtree etc are making it increasingly difficult to source all the things we need and desire, so chance favours the prepared mind. Stock up ASAP no matter the monetary damage I say!

Other than that, today I just cleared the yard and corn patch of salt bush and weeds. We have had a mild summer and heavy rains. Camping should be glorious in the desert this winter!


 
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Kindlling

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Great idea, Kindling! It would be interesting to hear how the edge perfoms, especially given the punishment the tip can withstand. I mean lets face it, military field knives not the best slicers out there as it is, but that is a trade off many accept for their strength and wide range of applications.
I dismissed the Glock FM-78 for years as it wasn't full tang. That was my mistake. After listening to Fernando's reviews from the 'The Modern Survivalist' channel on You Tube (see below), I reconsidered. I think the strength of this knife comes from the flexibility of the handles super polymer and the German or Austrian spring steel used in the blade.
Yes I like quality, but oftentimes it comes at a price! I remorse over the money I have spent on high end knives over the years. The Glock is a rare exception. I like the Glock for its protection factor, strength and the how light it is. I could go on for hours about the Glock FM-78 knife. It really is a case study in knife making, IMO, and somthing we may never see again, at least at its initial price.
The powers that be and private corporations like PayPal, Ebay, Amazon and Gumtree etc are making it increasingly difficult to source all the things we need and desire, so chance favours the prepared mind. Stock up ASAP no matter the monetary damage I say!

Yes i know fernando from modern survivalist .
Recently watched him do an interview with ‘star path academy ‘ on youtube too which was very good .

If we are talking realistic hybrid survival , i mean including civilization .

These guys give the dreamers a reality check .:)

Yes re : the slicing ability of the glock , think i have gutted a fish with it , not filleted one though .

It gets the job done though , i appreciate it for all its ruggedness .
 

Mozzie

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Five days away, camping and kayaking, NSW far South Coast.

It was HOT, 30+ every day, out on the lake was nice but the UV was a killer, looked for shade as much as possible.

Wonderful few days to reboot the system.

20220126_123833.jpg


20220126_153639.jpg

20220126_090407.jpg
 

Wentworth

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On Wednesday we headed out to a local creek to cook up flatbreads and barley stew from De Re Coquinaria, a Roman cookbook from the first century.
It's difficult to make stew look appetising in photos, so you'll have to take our word for it.
20220126_115626.jpg

20220126_104559.jpg

20220126_115443.jpg
On the weekend I went out to check out a spot in Wollemi that Corin had recommended.
We had a few visitors in camp who wanted to explore our foodbags till we moved them.
20220129_161825.jpg

20220129_180815.jpg

20220129_150355.jpg
It was a great little trip, but the night was so warm all I needed was a mozzie net, no quilt or jumper.
 

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Mozzie

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On Wednesday we headed out to a local creek to cook up flatbreads and barley stew from De Re Coquinaria, a Roman cookbook from the first century.
It's difficult to make stew look appetising in photos, so you'll have to take our word for it.


On the weekend I went out to check out a spot in Wollemi that Corin had recommended.
We had a few visitors in camp who wanted to explore our foodbags till we moved them.

It was a great little trip, but the night was so warm all I needed was a mozzie net, no quilt or jumper.
Nice outing Aris, we have the best weather but not so much when its still stinking hot at night.
Great spot for camp on the sand.

You sure thats STEW your showing us, looks like puree pizza :rolleyes: :unsure: (just kidding)
To be honest ANY meal cooked out bush is wonderful.
 

Wentworth

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Yes the stew always looks like a formless mass in pics!
Envious of your 5 dayer. It's been 2 years now since I was out for more than a couple of nights.
Hopefully this is the year that changes that.
 

Randall

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We're in Derby again. An MTB holiday. Self contained accommodation (sorry folks :D ). We had two nights and a day at Falmouth (linked video isn't mine) on the way up - an awesome half day rock hopping along the coast. Basil the staghound was a bit put off when it came to rock hopping, but after a few goes he's all over it.

Mountain biking in Derby is awesome. Some epic rides - I'm gone for a minimum of 2 but usually 3hrs. During that time it is a real adventure. Two of my favorites are snig track and Kings wall (not my videos). I do my own riding up everywhere which doubles my fun. I now have an ebike so it's even more fun than it used to be.

I've been taking Basil for a run (while I ride) along a tourist type track that follows the river. It doesn't get a lot of use and it's flat. He goes for a dip at the turn around point. He tries to attack the bike now and then :D, that's probably my fault for chasing him around the yard with it.
 
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