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What's in your garden?

Jacko

Les Hiddins
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I wonder how much of that Weed is edible Weed gelandangan, Dandelion, Wild Lettuce, Rocket and the like. I am not one to Weed our Lawn because it has edible weeds growing in it

This link is from a thread on Bushcraft Oz a while back

http://www.eatthatweed.com/

regards Jacko
 

gelandangan

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Careful what you say on public forums G, Big brother is always watching..... :)



:_lol::_applauso: So true !! never thought of it..
Of course they are very welcome to remove them from my premises :_lol:
 

gelandangan

Rüdiger Nehberg
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I wonder how much of that Weed is edible Weed gelandangan, Dandelion, Wild Lettuce, Rocket and the like. I am not one to Weed our Lawn because it has edible weeds growing in it

This link is from a thread on Bushcraft Oz a while back

http://www.eatthatweed.com/

regards Jacko

You are correct, however since I live in the suburbs near the city, I guess every drop of rain and even the air would contain some sort of contamination.
Added to that, my little dog also do her toilet in the garden..
So there rest my case..
 

auscraft

Henry Arthur Readford
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I think when many think gardens and vegetable gardens they think large picturesque places well maintained, lush , green relaxing place to be. I don't see this as reality in any garden there are huge variances that can effect them, I believe what ever your situation is land size , temps , rainfall or even knowledge is; you do the best you can do within your abilities and available recourses even a herb garden helps or even just something you regularly eat all helps you but only grow what you will eat .
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Had my first dragon fruit flowers, being a cacti type of plant it is a short lived mainly nocturnal flower.
By mid morning they had collapsed.
DSCF6682 (800x600).jpg
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DSCF6675 (800x644).jpg
 

Bloffy13

Jon Muir
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I've just started a square foot garden in one of my raised beds. Basically each square foot is treated like a mini garden in its own right. My garden is 3 x 8 (ish) feet with snap peas (5 feet), cabbage (2), brown onions (2), spring onions (2), broccoli (2), beetroot (2), capsicum (3), carrots (4) and brussel sprouts (2).
I only planted it last week so it's not all fully sprouted yet but I am excited about this.
There's heaps on the internet about it but most of it is American. The few Australian sites I've found are thin on info.
In short, by having a range of plants in a small area, insects get confused and there is less loss than traditional row gardening.
Companion planting is a big part of it but ATM I am just putting in what I need willy nilly.
Planting spaces are condensed in each lot and you encourage your garden to go up (eg trellis' for peas etc.)
For instance a cabbage will take up one square foot by itself but peas will have 16 peas planted in each square foot and trained up a trellis while maybe 9 carrots will be in the next square foot.
It also is great for lazy gardeners like myself because you don't need to weed and water as much.
As each square foot is harvested, it is cleaned out and replanted with something different. As far as I can work out, there isn't a lot of need to fertilise as plants tend to take out or put back certain nutrients etc but time will tell there.
If this works I am going to do the other three beds and see how I go with different plants as well. We eat a fair bit of corn, lettuce, peas etc so they will feature strongly but I am going to try some "experimental" stuff too.
Interesting path as to how I got onto this too. I obviously have an interest in bushcrafting. While researching pioneer crafts on the 'net I came across several sustainable lifestyle sites which led me to (semi-directly) setting up my raised bed gardens which did pretty well in their first year. I then recently came across a great book titled Practical Self Sufficiency (Dick and James Strawbridge - published by Dorling Kindersley Australia, commonly known as DK Books *No affiliation). It has some wonderful information but really only one paragraph about square foot gardening. Well Google is my friend and it led me on my most recent tangent, which has seen me dividing my garden into smaller blocks and getting excited about pea sprouts coming out of the ground (Draws a big breath and plops down onto the ground, exhausted).
Sorry about that but just thought it might show how bushcrafting affects our lives in so many other ways than just tarps, hammocks, knives and firesteels. When you think about it, many of the skills we aim to master were just part of everyday life of our forebears and gardening and the whole self sufficient lifestyle was a natural (but not as sexy) extension of that.
Apols for the rant. We now resume normal transmission.
Cheers
Bloffy
 

eggbert

Russell Coight
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Dick Strawbridge came to fame from the UK gameshow scrapheap challenge. An engineer by trade from memory that has since become somewhat of a greenie.
 

Lifecraft

John McDouall Stuart
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At the moment (or just finished in the last month or so):
- pumpkins (about 11 large jarrah and 13 butternuts)
- corn (wasn't a great crop but still tasty)
- spinach
- eshallots
- onions
- tomatoes (loads of tomatoes, all from volunteer plants)
- strawberries
- beans (though the birds are decimating the plants)
- sunflowers
- lemon
- orange
- mandarin
- kaffir lime
- lemon grass
- mulberries
- rosemary
- basil
- thyme
- chilli
- lettuce
- beetroot
- cucumber
- rhubarb

And there's a few edible weeds I leave in the garden:
- wood sorrel
- dandelion
- gotu kola
- amaranth

There's probably more I've missed too.

I mostly follow the One Straw Revolution approach. I try not to dig the soil, or to add too much stuff to the soil (once it's set up and can take care of itself, though I do add some stuff to set up the garden bed initially).
When the soil is covered in living mulch I also generally don't water (though I do water if I feel it necessary, due to the soil being exposed).

I prepared the area to the right level (terraced, with rock walls), then brought in trailer loads of free mulch from the tip (although paid the 6 dollars to get them to load it into the trailer with the loader because it's quick and good value, it's free if you load it yourself). and covered all the gardens in a really thick layer.

I scattered a little bit of the original clay/sand soil over the mulch and raked it in (to add some minerals and water holding abilities from the clay, and some drainage and structure with the sand).
Then I gave the new soil/mulch a dose of blood and bone, blood meal, seasol, and a wetting agent.
Some of the garden also got a layer of sugarcane mulch on top, just to top it all off and make it look nicer. Plus it's good mulch.

The top layer of the mulch is dry (usually) and protects the soil. The layer underneath that has already started breaking down into nice humus.
What is considered "mulch" from the tip is half compost. It is already half decomposed (which is good).

Most of those gardens were then covered in pumpkins, corn, and a few other easy things to grow. It's ready now to be planted out again for autumn and winter crops.

I can usually just go and stick my hand into the soil, and pull up a handful, because it's quite loose and airy.
The soil that was there before, no chance of me digging it just with my hands.
When I do that (to see what the soil is like underneath) I almost always see loads of white myceleum, and I'm trying not to disturb it, because that's what will break down the woody part of the mulch/compost.
I also see the mushrooms popping up everywhere. I'll try to get photos sometime so we can ID them.
There's also loads of worm in it, which must have come up from underground.

The myceleum and the worms are my farm hands. They do all the work so I don't have to.

The pumpkins did amazingly well. Some of the other stuff suffered from nitrogen deficiency (which is expected initially as the woody mulch breaks down, and which is why I added blood meal and blood and bone).

It should just keep getting better and better as it breaks down, to feed the soil.


I will add... what I need to do now is go and cut all the finished plants back (such as corn), chop it up roughly, then either scatter it all over the garden (to become new mulch) or make piles of it throughout the garden (to become compost heaps).
This process of constantly adding mulch, which becomes compost, on top of the garden (rather than in a separate location) is what I believe is the backbone of the One Straw Revolution approach.
Mulch is the key (just like in the rainforest).

Once the garden stabilises, that mulch should be the only thing you add to the soil (except maybe seeds).
Shouldn't need water, fertilizer, compost, etc. Shouldn't even really need seeds if you let stuff self seed.
 
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Lifecraft

John McDouall Stuart
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I guess every drop of rain and even the air would contain some sort of contamination.

I'd bet that if you bought standard mass grown vegetables the pesticides and stuff on it would be far worse than contamination from a city.

I watched a show where a chef in London set up a restaurant from entirely locally sourced produce (places he could get to on the tram/train mostly, with a few exceptions).

Many people said "I'm not eating anything grown in London" so he went and asked a toxicologist about it.

The toxicologist said something like "the benefit of consuming fresh, local produce, far outweighs any issues of contamination".
When the chef asked "so would you eat the food?"
The toxicologist said something like "sure, if you're cooking, I'm coming".

I can't remember the name of the show. It was on SBS I think.
 

auscraft

Henry Arthur Readford
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Just planted my Garlic bulbs looking forward to summer to retrieve new garlic.
And turmeric already starting to show signs of forming as well as ginger
 
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