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Yurts

Blackhawk

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I have been keenly follwing Dave Canterbury's ''Journal of the Yurt'' series.Having it sparked my interest in these and other semi-permanent shelters,I've been trying to find what's available locally.The ones I have looked at are generally a more permanent(and expensive) version with the basic ones only available for hire.Why does everything have to be so flash and complicated? The other option is to build one myself.We have plenty of room on our place and I would love to use one as a semi permanent camp in the cooler months.Any thoughts?
 

Blake

Nest In the Hills
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Gday blackhawk,

Ive been watching dave's videos also. I must say its raised my interest also. I suppose you could try and get some cheapish felt for constructing the roof. Some walls seem to be made of wood materials and no necessarily are the same material as the roof. Maybe strips of stringybark would work for the walls of the yurt? I know stringybark was used for alot of old huts in Australia. I imagine it would have pretty decent insulation value given the way the bark is structured.

image006.gif
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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A yurt would make a nice gazebo out in the backyard even in summer if you can roll the sides up.
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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I think you should look into building one. It would be fun and really should not be too hard; I'm sure there are plenty of folk on the internet who can give guidance.

Its basically a ring of lattice walls and a dozen or so poles for the roof structure, then your choice of covering materials ....

I think by definition it is all fairly light weight construction so it reallyshould not be difficult - if you have enough land you may be able to source some of the poles from your own property ?
 

Wave Man

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I too have been watching Journal of the Yurt, they look good and as others have said, try building one your self. Buying one would be expensive. They are just a wooden frame covered in canvas. Have a look at youtube there are a heap of yurt vids.
 

Steve

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Take a look at at mongolian yurts, Ray mears did an episode on the the "land of Ghengis Khan" years ago which featured the there setup for a yurt.

Heres part 1 on Youtube.

[video=youtube;1xeCqN2Sjzk]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1xeCqN2Sjzk[/video]

Part 2
[video=youtube;AWXpJQwMNFY]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AWXpJQwMNFY&feature=related[/video]

Part 3 (final)
[video=youtube;Tn2Jch1hX2Q]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tn2Jch1hX2Q&feature=related[/video]
 

TasMonk

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Yurts are awesome. My wife and I have been designing and building our own 6m yurt for a couple years now. It's part of our "grand plan" as we intend to be living in it for a while after we buy our wilderness block until we get more permanent structures up. In the mean time it's being put up in the bit of bush some of my wife's family owns and will hopefully serve as our weekend home by fall.
 

Greatbloke

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If you wanted to make a cheapo version....Maybe it would be possible to get some of that old fashion trellis that folds out into diamond shapes for the walls then wrap a tarp around them. The roof would be a bit harder but you might be able form a shallow cone from steel the size of the top of a 44 gallon drum and screw -say 50mm- PVC pipes to it into which bamboo rafters would stick into like the hub of a bike wheel with spokes coming out.
 

Aussie123

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Yurts are awesome. My wife and I have been designing and building our own 6m yurt for a couple years now. It's part of our "grand plan" as we intend to be living in it for a while after we buy our wilderness block until we get more permanent structures up. In the mean time it's being put up in the bit of bush some of my wife's family owns and will hopefully serve as our weekend home by fall.

Hi TasMonk,
Any pictures or build details you can share ?
 

TasMonk

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Hi TasMonk,
Any pictures or build details you can share ?

I'll see about uploading some photos, but for now here are some of the main build details: 6m diameter with three doors equi-distant around the perimeter (one main in/out, one to a small external closet with a composting loo, and the third as the attachment to a possible future secondary yurt). The outer cover is UV-treated heavy industrial tarp material over insulating layers of large-cell bubblewrap to minimize thermal loss and condensation/mold while maintaining translucency so natural light filters through the walls. Walls and roof are bamboo, with doorframes and such in Tassie oak. The central skylight is a 1m-wide octagon, also of Tassie oak, with a framed plexiglass window that opens for ventilation. The subfloor is of treated pine, with green-tongue flooring overlaid. It's quite a bit more elaborate than what ol' Dave has been showing...
 

TasMonk

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Down here in Tassie it wouldn't be very comfortable most of the year without some source of heating! ;) We've got a small woodstove that sits a bit off-center in the yurt. It's a "baker's Oven" by Nectre (see: http://www.nectre.com/index.php?page=baker-s-oven) so provides general heating, cooking surface, baking oven, and hot water supply. It's a very nice solution to multiple problems all in a very compact form but it is both the most expensive and the least portable (read: "real b!t*h to move!") component so far.
 

climbndrive

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I did a bit of travelling in Alaska and fell in love with a longterm tent you could put a potbelly in it was held up with wooden spars ,made by a company called Alaska Tarp and tent,they have a large range of sizes and fabrics,prices wern,t to bad either thought about getting one sent over,they are on the web.
 
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